All That Glitters Is Not Gold – Anymore


INTERIOR DESIGN
DWELLING
dwellingjh.com

Story By
Julie Fustanio Kling

Photos By
David Agnello


How do you incorporate your favorite patterns into a sophisticated new look for your home? Ask interior designer Kate Binger, the founder of Dwelling. She brightened up this active family’s Solitude home using modern textures and colors that complement the family’s favorite Pendleton plaids. The entire house was painted gold, which dumbed down the brilliance of the wood ceilings, making the house feel dark and heavy, Binger says. The walls are mostly white now, with a few key ones clad in barnwood. “Barnwood is an excellent accent. It gives houses lacking texture an instant interest and depth.”

LEFT A twig chandelier, reflected in a gold-framed mirror, whimsically plays off a new, reclaimed-barnwood wall and lightens the feel of this remodeled dining room.

WHEN I USE OVERSIZED MIRRORS, I LIKE TO PLAN THE REFLECTION OF AT LEAST ONE LARGE WINDOW.
— KATE BINGER

LEFT A pop of color from a red-lacquered coffee table enlivens a dynamic mix of neutral colors and natural fabrics in the living room. Dog friendly fibers throughout the house allow the pets to reign.

A balance of neutrals and pops of colors and dog-friendly fibers contextualizes the home in its dense forest setting, allowing the owners to let their rescued Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs happily roam free.
Binger seems to attract clients who enjoy living hard in their homes, just as she does. Feet on the table, wine and dogs on the sofa and muddy boots on the entry rug; she enjoys this aspect of entwining form and function in her designs. In the dining room, a large, gold-framed mirror on the barnwood-sided wall lightens up the open floor plan, reflecting the windows that look out onto a creek and a grove of trees. “When I use oversized mirrors, I like to plan the reflection of at least one large window.” Binger says. “In this case, the dining wall was an instant win for a mirror since it is able to reflect the transom windows, operable windows and the stone of the fireplace.”

For me, clean lines paired with the warmth of texture and color is paramount.
— KATE BINGER

ABOVE In the master bedroom, a clean-lined leather headboard against another reclaimed-barnwood wall creates a warm and welcoming place to curl up with a Pendleton blanket. Lacquered navy blue nightstands with gold and marble knobs flank the bed and play off the velvet window treatments. A custom watercolor of magpie feathers by artist Eric Patrick Kelly is a perfect place to rest your eye.

She also makes a good case for introducing bright colors, especially because of the long, white winters here. A wood pedestal coffee table is painted with red lacquer and designed to function as a gathering place for drinks and games. The red brings a playful aspect to the colorful mosaic of cowboy paintings by Duke Beardsley from Altamira Gallery. At the bar, Binger chose barnwood shelving, which complements the matte, etched-limestone backsplash tile. Cowhide and polished-chrome barstools create a great contrast to the existing cherry cabinetry. A funky twig chandelier brings whimsy to the custom, live-edge dining table.

ABOVE Smoky purple walls and linen window treatments soften the geometric grey patterns in the guest bedroom, where Binger introduced faux shagreen nightstands and a headboard wrapped in a bird’s-eye stitched linen.

In the master bedroom, a classic leather headboard and navy painted nightstands balance the pop of the lounge chairs, which are covered, of course, in Pendleton wool. “For me, clean lines paired with the warmth of textures is paramount,” Binger says.