Meet Jacque Jenkins-Stireman: Quintessentially Client-Focused

Jacque Jenkins-Stireman-Design - Jackson Hole, Wyoming

A banner year, marked by milestone projects and two new team members, finds the creative climate inside Jacque Jenkins-Stireman’s eponymous interior design firm brimming with inspiration and activity.

From the moment Jacque opened her studio doors more than 15 years ago, she welcomed clients as friends—a genuine graciousness that evolved into enduring relationships with loyal families, many of whom announce their visits in advance so that Jacque and crew can ready their homes for their arrival. More than creative collaborators, Jacque’s team takes care of the homes they design long after the project wraps. Such enduring care grows from a natural extension of the firm’s friendship with clients.

Jacque’s approach epitomizes personal touch, says Ashley Cadwalader, Director of Operations. “We go the extra mile. We are truly client focused, taking everything to that next level. That’s the reason we had to grow: we have built a wonderful sense of expectation among our clients, above and beyond designing their homes.”

With this individualized approach in mind, it seemed only natural for the firm to take a moment and introduce itself—in its new, five-strong form. Bringing diverse backgrounds and expertise, the JJS Design team members complement one another.

The introductions must begin, as the firm did, with Jacque herself: Over the course of her two-decade career, Principal Jacque Jenkins-Stireman has designed an ambitious array of interiors across the country, from residential homes to commercial spaces and premier resort developments. She began building her portfolio in Newport Beach, California, where she graduated from the Interior Design Institute after receiving her BA from San Jose State University. She moved to Jackson nearly 20 years ago—a place that suits her tailored approach. No matter the scope of the project, Jacque places her client’s priorities first, knowing the design will follow once the vision and values are collaboratively set. By engaging all stakeholders and focusing on the client, she lets each interior’s aesthetic evolve in response to that core client relationship; fluent in a spectrum of styles, she deploys different textures, patterns and periods accordingly. Thoroughly bespoke, every interior designed by Jacque still bears the subtle imprint of her eclectic, vivid, informed imagination.

The most recent recruit, Interior Designer Brianna McIntire, elevates the technical capacity of the team. A Wyoming native, Brianna graduated from Arizona State University’s Herberger Institute of Art and Design with a BS in Interior Architecture and Design. She started her career working on commercial and residential projects, a spectrum that taught her a great deal about the systematics of structures and the relationship between architecture and interior design. Only in her home state could she pursue in tandem her passion for design and her outdoor pursuits. At JJS Design, she works on the construction side of projects, specializing in interior elevations and finishes.

Also new, Design Assistant Vanessa Pratt draws on her dozen years working in merchandising and buying—experience that honed her attention to detail, strong work ethic and time-management skills. A Boston native, she headed west for college, studying International Relations at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Enamored with the mountain lifestyle, she followed her love of adventure and skiing to Jackson. Creative and client-focused, Vanessa adds significantly to the team.

Associate Designer Kathie Harrington discovered her talent after designing her own home, even though her interest took root long before as an undergraduate studying home economics and as a mother creating spaces attuned to the well-being of her family. Her creative and committed approach finds her animating interiors with careful details and her timeless sense of style. She enjoys working closely with Jacque to help define and realize the vision of their clients.

In her role as Director of Operations Ashley Cadwalader manages client relations and drives the firm’s strategy and growth. She joined JJS Design in 2014, after starting her career in nonprofit marketing and event development—a resume that reflects her bachelor’s degree in Logistics and Marketing from the University of Tennessee. Keen to continue nurturing her business acumen, she recently earned her MPA from Villanova University, knowledge she brings to bear daily at JJS Design.

Each of these five talents followed their distinct trajectories to find themselves in Jackson, in a lasting home at JJS Design.

Collaborative Design: Farmer Payne Architects

Collaborative, a ubiquitous word used to fuse so many disparate entities, should have been reserved for a scenario like this: the collaborative design process of Farmer Payne Architects. A creative merging in the truest sense, the new firm grew from a long-standing friendship between two architects: Jackson native Jamie Farmer and Scott Payne of Louisiana. The two met as intern architects at Carney Logan Burke, where they gained invaluable experience working on high-end contemporary homes and luxury commercial buildings.

Jackson Hole has become known for its incredibly high-quality design standards,” Farmer says. “Jackson clients expect their architects to coordinate every piece of the project.

After collectively logging 11 years at CLB, Farmer and Payne each set off on their own, forming eponymous firms—Farmer in Jackson and Payne back in his hometown of Shreveport. Traveling on parallel tracks, they each built their personal portfolios before joining forces at the start of this year.

For Farmer and Payne, working together is a natural fit based on trust and expertise. Both bring a background in construction—Payne studied construction management and Farmer spent summers working construction. Such experience means their designs are simultaneously well-planned and innovative.

As principal architects, their collaborative approach considers all aspects of each project, from building a close relationship with the client to enlisting a contractor and design team early on so as to ensure a seamless design-to-build process. Tapping their well of experience in Wyoming and Louisiana, they assess their clients’ needs and tailor a team accordingly. “We get the team on board in the beginning,” Farmer says. Such early assembly ensures everyone is fully engaged in the success of the project, all working together toward a collective vision.

Eschewing a set style, Farmer and Payne embrace clean, refined designs. “Our style is rooted in connecting with the context and the people, which translates into greater versatility and diversity,” Farmer says. Consider their first project as a firm: A 5,000 sq. ft. home in the bayou of Louisiana, blending modern with colonial influence. Working onsite, Payne is leading the project management side, while Farmer is working with the design team in Jackson. The two communicate constantly, and trust each other to fulfill their respective roles. “We anticipate each other’s every move,” Farmer says.  

The merger has expanded the geographic scope of their respective practices. Most often, new clients find them through referrals from real estate agents or contractors. Farmer and Payne consider their clients to be their primary collaborators, listening and evolving their ideas throughout the design process. As principals, they are committed to being hands-on with every project. Keen to grow as firm, they never want to lose that personal connection to each client. “We will always be actively involved throughout the whole process,” Farmer says.

What’s On Your Walls?

Today, we’re excited to introduce a guest blog by Jennifer Prugh Visosky, the owner of local interior design firm Grace Home Design. We’ve long been fans of Jennifer’s funky, fresh style in a variety of Jackson Hole residential projects. In our “A Home in Tune” Dream Home piece from the 2015 issue, we covered an extensive remodel she completed in partnership with Jackson Hole Contracting. In that home, fantastic wallpaper selection made a big impact. To learn more, we asked Jennifer to weigh in with tips and snippets from her portfolio. The message? Don’t fear introducing new textures to your home designs. It just might bring the music of your room to life.

In the mountains, there is an odd, yet understandable, aversion to wallpaper. Perhaps designers don’t want to offend the “majestic views,” or maybe they feel that pattern and texture will overwhelm log walls and reclaimed wood floors.

The truth? Wallpaper is perfect in the mountains, and (when done properly) it actually compliments all of the beauty outside our front doors.

Think about it. The outdoors are a riot of color. Mother Nature isn’t drab and brown, she’s bright, fresh and a little garish—greens, reds, yellows, purples and blues mixed with texture and grit. When we want to “bring the outdoors in,” wallpaper just makes sense.

Of course, you don’t want a wall of dark, moody blooms next to a wall of windows looking out onto the Tetons, but a feather pattern in a powder room? Yes please. Or how about a bedroom with a headboard wall of flowers?

The key is choosing a pattern that is reminiscent of your surroundings. You don’t want palm trees in Jackson or aspen trees in Key West. But whimsical, colorful, bold? As long as the pattern or texture or color makes sense, run with it.

The only other rule? Create calm among the patterns by pulling out some of the colors for accents, furniture and lighting to create a classic, yet thought-provoking balance.

Here Are a Few Examples of Mountain-Appropriate Wallpaper

Headboard Wall
Headboard Wall
This master suite is a study in balance—girly without veering too close to “man repeller” sweet. The depth of the acid-green floral Elitis “Opulence” wallpaper requires that the rest of the room be steeped in calm with solid fabrics and layered neutrals. A dusty pink herringbone wool daybed keeps the room from floating away on pastels, fluffy pillows, and dainty furniture.

Powder Room Grace Home Design
Wallpaper in a Powder Room
This exceptional feather paper from Elitis makes the powder room a complete showstopper. Not only is the color palette spot on for a mountain home, the pattern is a bold twist on traditional mountain design. I love using wallpaper in powder rooms because it transforms a potentially dull space into a jewel box.

Contemporary Child Grace Home Design
Grown Up Little Girl’s Room
The two patterns in this space are a combination of metallic and cream, and a mottled pattern of bright pinks and yellows on a cream background. Again, the motif nods to mountain neutrals, with a delicate splash of color…kind of like a Wyoming meadow dotted with bright flowers. With so much pattern in the space, we kept everything else simple and neutral with a couple of pops of bright pink to bring out the color in the walls.

My Favorite Resources
With all of the advances in printing technology today, there are endless possibilities for wild designs, super vibrant colors and 3-D texture. This is truly artwork for your walls. Here are a few of my favorite new resources that will make you reconsider wallpaper.

Elitis: Excellent patterns, colors and innovative ideas.

Wall & Deco: Love using their outdoor wallpaper for bringing pattern to a bathroom or outside space.

Flat Vernacular: Truly some of the best patterns in the business with witty and often humorous prints.

Your 4 Walls: This company designs great papers with a lot of texture and more neutral colors. If you are looking for understated, this is the place to shop.

Flavor Paper: Edgy, urban and very artistic. This company has some really outstanding patterns that you won’t find anywhere else.

About Grace Home Design & Life’s Too Short For Beige

Life’s Too Short for Beige is a fresh, feisty, audacious resource for vibrant, colorful, playful living. It’s a place to ignite your passion for design, get you excited about discovering new ideas and then show you how to infuse these ideas into your own homes.

Grace Home Design is the brainchild of Jackson Hole interior designer Jennifer Prugh Visosky.

Interested in guest posting on the Homestead Blog? Contact us!

New WRJ Design Showroom Opens for Appointments in Jackson Hole

WRJ Design’s new WRJ Rustic showroom includes such unique pieces as a wooden Asian trough used as table centerpiece and a vintage Philadelphia birdhouse shown atop a rusted metal wine rack.

WRJ Design’s new WRJ Rustic showroom includes such unique pieces as a wooden Asian trough used as table centerpiece and a vintage Philadelphia birdhouse shown atop a rusted metal wine rack.

Whether it’s to browse sumptuous samples of exclusively-carried luxury brand lines or to mingle with artists during the annual Palates & Palettes Fall Arts Festival event, our team has always admired WRJ Design’s downtown showroom space. Blending design inspiration with singularly spectacular retail selections, the showroom is a top destination for anyone who is designing, buying, or decorating a home. And now, much to the excitement of these same interior aficionados, WRJ has announced the opening of a new showroom–WRJ Rustic. This expanded space will house antiques, collectibles and rustic design, providing another beautiful venue to absorb the freshest takes on designing for our valley, all while sparking inspiration that truly crosses the globe. Learn more below:

WRJ Design of Jackson Hole has expanded its showroom space with the addition of WRJ Rustic, an additional showroom highlighting antiques, collectibles and more “rustic” design elements and ideas, says WRJ Design CEO Rush Jenkins. WRJ Rustic is now open by appointment.

“Our clients enjoy both contemporary and rustic design – and everything in between,” says Jenkins. “We’ve created the new showroom with a more rustic flavor, giving focus to antiques and collectibles from all over the world – Europe, Asia, the U.S., Turkey and Morocco.” Pieces currently for sale in the recently completed showroom can range from the whimsical – a 20th century German gerbil cage that mimics European houses – to the unusual and unexpected – an industrial-looking rusted metal grid wine rack and a clean-lined Philadelphia birdhouse with “window” detailing on either end and a rich patina.

“Some of our one-of-a kind pieces include wooden troughs from Asia that make wonderful centerpieces on a table, vintage cabinets from the Adirondacks, and very special hand carved stags with original antlers from the late 18th-/early 19th-century royal hunting lodge of the Prince and Princess of Belgium,” says Jenkins.

“Rustic interpretation is in the eye of the beholder,” explains WRJ Design COO Klaus Baer. “For WRJ, we interpret rustic as having clean lines, and not restricted to the styles of the American West. Our take is more global, with both European and American mountain influences – and then incorporating the unique and textural rustic pieces into contemporary clean design.”

The WRJ Showroom in Jackson is known for displaying the work of a carefully curated selection of artists, with a focus on local work. WRJ Rustic will show the work of three artists new to WRJ, whose work offered an intriguing counterpoint to the new showroom’s rustic style: Montana artist Julie Chapman and Havoc and Laura Hendricks of Salt Lake City.

WRJ Rustic is open by appointment only; appointments can be made at the WRJ Showroom, 30 S. King Street, or by phone at 307-200-4881.

About WRJ Design:

Headquartered in Jackson, Wyoming, WRJ Design imparts the special serenity of its local Teton landscape to interior designs in Jackson Hole and across the country. Begun out of a passion for great design by Rush Jenkins and Klaus Baer, WRJ creates experiences and environments through its designs, whether for interiors or exhibitions, that provide timeless reflections of the owners or collectors. WRJ’s exhibition designs for titans of philanthropy, fashion, music and politics offer insight into the lives of these luminaries as they showcase the objects they loved. For more information visit www.wrjdesign.com.

The Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes Raises Funds; Inspires Patrons

Imagine your home inspiration Pinterest board brought to life.

This is the access that Homestead Magazine’s Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes gives ticket holders each year during the Fall Arts Festival: entree into multiple outstanding residences in diverse regions of the valley; a full team of professionals on hand to answer your questions about just how that home automation system was installed, how those light fixtures were custom-made, or how the architect designed the perfect space to suit the family’s needs; and as an added bonus, the opportunity to give back to the local community via your ticket sales.

For the team at Homestead, the third annual self-guided home tours made it clear that this event has become a staple of many home-and-art lovers’ yearly calendar. We were honored to welcome back many repeat patrons and professionals, all while bringing new, truly special homes to our ticket holders.

Note the rustic reclaimed barnwood at the Lodge at Fish Creek.

“The home tour is one of my family’s favorite events of the [Fall Arts Festival],” wrote one returning patron. “Our tradition is to spend Friday visiting the homes and having lunch in between visits. I honestly can’t think of any improvements–the homes this year were very different in style & location and we loved seeing each of them. Had never been to the Fish Creek area and especially loved seeing that new area. Thank you for all the hard work put into the home tour – we wouldn’t miss it!”

Another returning patron with a second home in Jackson noted that she met her interior decorator at the first Showcase of Homes event; now, she was back, bent on grilling John Carney, architect and homeowner at the Fish Creek Compound, about the finish on the treated cement floors in his home. Another group of friends tackled their tour via bicycle, enjoying a leisurely day of pedaling in Teton Village. Whether participants planned a full afternoon of exploring the valley, or spread their self-guided experience out over more than one day, the beautiful fall weather and spectacular destinations made for a plethora of newly discovered design resources.

From serenely wooded lots to ski-in/ski-out solitude; contemporary open floor plans to rustic lodge seclusion, the six homes presented during the Showcase of Homes presented a vital cross-section of Jackson Hole living. At the Snake River Sporting Club, two residences with interiors by WRJ Design were featured, allowing for a breathtaking drive along the river with fall colors on full display.

For the professionals involved in designing, decorating, and building each home, the tour has retained its value as well.

“It was an honor to have two Carney Logan Burke houses on the Showcase of Homes 2015 Tour. I only regret that I could not be in two places at once. It was truly gratifying to hear all the positive comments about our house on Fish Creek Road, and the appreciative ‘ooh’s and ah’s’ as visitors entered the living room and saw the view of the Sleeping Indian. I was impressed at how thoughtful and thankful the nearly 200 people who came were that we had opened up our home,” recapped John Carney of Carney Logan Burke Architects. Showing his personal residence and guest house meant that patrons received a rare glimpse of how an architect translates his own design principles and lifestyle into fully realized vision.

Teton Heritage Builders and Xssentials, who partnered to host a stop of the tour at the Ridgetop Pavilion, hope to show another home in a future tour as well.”Teton Heritage Builders was happy to have had two homes on the tour this year: the Ridgetop Pavilion and Teton Village Retreat (designed by Ellis Nunn Architects). It was a pleasure to have spent two fantastic days treating the 200 plus folks who joined us to a hot dog and a great home tour. The compliments were well received and we look forward to the potential of partnering again with Xssentials on another home for the Showcase tour. Thanks to all the folks that made this a charitable event to remember.”

The third boon to enjoying the Showcase of Homes? That would be the over $6,000 raised to benefit non-profits chosen by our homeowners. These donated funds can now be put to good use in the local community via the important conservation work of the Nature Conservancy (Wyoming Chapter), the Jackson Hole Land Trust, and the Grand Teton National Park Foundation. For a community where landscape and living space are so intimately connected, it makes sense to give back to the very organizations that preserve this precious–and limited–resource.

The Homestead Magazine team is now hard at work producing our next annual print issue. Often, our Dream Homes provide a sneak peek into the roster of exclusive properties that will be featured during upcoming Showcase of Homes tours. Stay tuned by reading back issues and subscribing on our site today!

Thank you for joining us. We hope to see you next year.

Learn more about the six homes and professionals featured in the 2015 tour: Ridgetop Pavilion, Fish Creek Compound, Lodge at Fish Creek, Fairway Haven, Tall Timber Cottage

Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival Highlights

The Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival is up and running once more! For valley residents, artists, gallery owners, and collectors from near and far, the Festival represents a seasonal return, full of celebration and inspiration. For ten days, a series of events welcomes members of the community into artistic spaces and brings art and cuisine–quite literally–into the streets. In addition, artisans and artists from across the creative spectrum maximize their opportunities to mingle with potential collectors, and collectors bid and buy work ranging from small sketches and miniatures to large paintings by world-renowned artists. It’s kind of a big deal.

At Homestead Magazine, we love community events that bring diverse community members out to toast the art in our own backyards. Here are some highlights and photos to get you excited for all the can’t-miss events happening from September 9-20! If you love architecture, interior design, and touring Jackson’s gorgeous neighborhoods, snap up tickets now for our own event, the Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes, which kicks off next weekend and provides an opportunity for intimate access to some of the valley’s most spectacular homes–plus the professionals who helped create them. (Sept 18 & 19, 11am-4pm, two-day self-guided tour)

We’ll see you at the Festival!

Altamira Fine Art, Palates & Palettes, Fall Arts Festival 2014

Tonight! Palates & Palettes Gallery Walk

More than 30 art galleries open their doors to showcase magnificent art with food and wine. The festive event is open to the public and presents the opportunity to visit with old friends and new. Many other businesses and arts organizations join the fun and add to the atmosphere. Gallery maps are available at participating galleries, at the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce, and in a variety of promotional publications that will be available at hotels and businesses. 5:00-8:00pm at Participating Galleries

Taste of the Tetons 2014

Taste of the Tetons — Saturday, September 13

Valley chefs, restaurants, and caterers put their best culinary work on display. In addition to the open-air tasting fair, participants will enjoy the wine tasting and silent auction presented by Rotary Supper Club, “Pickin’ in the Park” live musical entertainment,”Pinky Painting in the Park” presented by the Howdy Pardners Ambassador Club will get the kids involved in making art, and the Takin’ It to the Streets art fair presented by the Art Association of Jackson Hole presents local artists selling their work.Food and wine samples are exchanged for tickets that may be purchased at any of the four corners of Town Square. Each taste ticket is $1. Samples generally range from two to four tickets. NEW! Tasters are invited to vote on three categories: Best Taste, Best Presentation, and Most Creative. Ballots will be handed out with tickets and will be collected in the center of Town Square. 11:00am-4:00pm on Town Square

Gallery Walk, Ringholz Gallery, 2014

Fall Arts Festival Art Walk — Wednesday, September 16

Circle back to any galleries you missed during Palates & Palettes! 5-8 p.m. at all Jackson Hole Gallery Association member businesses. Free.

Quick Draw 2014

20th Annual Jackson Hole Quick Draw Art Sale and Auction

The Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce is pleased to present nationally, regionally, and locally recognized artists who will demonstrate their skills at this unique al fresco event. One-of a-kind artwork will be auctioned off following the ninety-minute creative process where spectators will watch artists paint and sculpt. The auction also features the sale of the 2015 Fall Arts Festival featured painting, “13 Minutes from Eternity” by Billy Schenck, who reprises his roll — he was the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival’s FIRST poster artist. The event is open to the public and free to attend. Individuals who are interested in purchasing the artwork should register in advance at the information table. 9:00am, Jackson Town Square

Questions about the Festival? Contact: Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce, 307-733-3316 or info@jacksonholechamber.com

Tour of Homes gives a glimpse of the Top

Fish Creek Lodge - Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes

Fish Creek Lodge – Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes

By Jason Suder / Jackson Hole News & Guide / Sept. 09, 2105

Nobody comes to the Tetons to sit inside, but enjoying the mountains from the comfort of a living room does have its attractions.

Jackson architects, designers, builders and landscapers have worked wonders in their fields, and some of them will get to show off their finest during the 2015 Fall Arts Festival as Homestead Magazine presents its third annual Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes.

Set for 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18, and Saturday, Sept. 19, the Showcase of Homes celebrates these domestic accomplishments with a self-guided tour of a few of Jackson Hole’s most spectacular living spaces.

“We choose homes based on location in the valley, architectural style and the range of professionals behind the project,” said Latham Jenkins, founder and president of Circ Design, which publishes Homestead and organizes the Showcase of Homes.

Five residences were selected to show a cross section of the valley’s designs, from the more traditional to mountain modern. During the two-day event ticket holders will be able to explore the houses and discuss design elements with the professionals who designed and built them.

Local charities benefit from the tour, with proceeds from ticket sales supporting organizations selected by each homeowner. They include the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival, Grand Teton National Park Foundation and the Jackson Hole Land Trust.

Fishcreek Compound - Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes

Fishcreek Compound – Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes

Unlike gallery artists, who are able to show work in public settings, architects and interior designers mostly operate in the private realm. The Showcase of Homes is an opportunity for John Carney of Carney Logan Burke Architects to expose some of his work that few people ever see.

“We do these beautiful one-off houses,” he said, “and unless the client had a commitment to want to share that they typically will shy away from that kind of thing.”

Carney is responsible for the architecture of two projects in this year’s Showcase of Homes. His Lodge at Fish Creek represents his talent for adhering to the rustic character of the valley.

Although not as classic as what the phrase “log cabin” conjures, these 12 homes in Shooting Star offer a clean look of wood slats and stone masonry exteriors. Large windows in the high-vaulted living rooms look out at mountain views, giving a contemporary slant to the ski-town chalet.

“It’s a little more contemporary, but still in the rustic category,” Carney said. “My house, by contrast, is much more modern.”

Carney’s own home, which is also on the tour, gives a deeper insight into the architectural process.

Carney will be available both days to explain his process, which begins with analyzing the landscape to help his clients stick to the design restrictions of their subdivisions but concludes with a personalized development.

Some homes feature trimless detail, which Russ Weaver, onsite superintendent of Ridgetop Pavilion atop North Gros Ventre Butte, pointed out allows the interior to flow into the natural contours of the landscape. This same living space has 360-degree views of the mountains: Sleeping Indian to the east, the Tetons to the north and west, and the Snake River Range to the south.

Ridgetop Pavilion - Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes

Ridgetop Pavilion – Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes

The large number of windows that give such views demanded that Weaver and his team undergo numerous energy tests that may become commonplace in coming years. A pressurized blower test and hot-water-supplementing solar panels were among them.

The final product of each home is an exhibition of the latest developments of architectural creation in the realm of mountain modern. Showcase of Homes offers this look into the creative process and use of the latest technology to build cutting-edge work.

“Unlike Homestead Magazine, which is a static medium, the Showcase of Homes is experiential,” Jenkins said. “Not only do you get to experience the special design, but you can interact with the artisans who created it.”

Without it, the mastery would remain restricted to homeowners and street-corner tourists.

“They really want people to come in and kick the tires,” Carney said.

Tickets cost $75 each and are limited to 250 people to ensure a personal and quality experience while also giving the professionals the ability to answer questions from each visitor. Tickets can be purchased at JacksonHoleShowcase.com.

The Western Design Conference Showcases Homestead Partners

Western Design Conference WRJ Design

Interior by WRJ Design


For our team at Homestead Magazine, the annual Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival represents the kick-off of a new season of design innovation and national attention to our homegrown hotbed of professional talent. We host our own Showcase of Homes on September 18th and 19th, and we encourage all of our readers and lovers of local home design to attend the Western Design Conference the week before. Spotlighting work by some of our partners–such as WRJ Design, Fighting Bear Antiques, Forsyth & Brown, and Xssentials–this year’s Designer Show House represents a chance to be inspired in rooms completely curated by the participating designers. Get your tickets today for both events and experience a double whammy of Jackson Hole architecture and interior design!

More information on the Western Design Conference below. All ticket proceeds from the Homestead Magazine Showcase of Homes are donated to local charities selected by our homeowners.

Design enthusiasts have even more to look forward to this year at the Western Design Conference (WDC) in Jackson Hole, Sept. 10-13, 2015. In addition to the four-day annual Exhibit + Sale and the Live Auction + Fashion Show at the Opening Preview Party, this year’s WDC – the world’s preeminent exhibition of handcrafted Western furniture, fashion and accessories – will feature an all new Designer Show House at the center of the exhibit space inside the Jackson, Wyo., Snow King Events Center.

Featuring six professionally designed rooms by Jackson Hole interior designers for guests to explore, the Designer Show House “gets Western Design Conference guests thinking beyond the remarkable individual objects and onto the idea of creating entire rooms,” says WDC Executive Director Allison Merritt. Guests of the WDC Opening Preview Party on Sept. 10 will have the additional opportunity to meet and talk with the show house interior designers who will be in their rooms and available to discuss their work.

Western Design Conference Victoria Scarlett

Interior by Victoria Scarlett

“I am thrilled with the inclusion of the Designer Show House in this year’s event,” says Merritt. “We have such incredibly talented designers in Jackson, and to give each of them a life-size platform to showcase their work is exciting for the Western Design Conference Exhibit + Sale. We’re pleased to be able to provide attendees such a visual and interactive design experience in real room settings.”

The Designer Show House foyer will be designed by Rush Jenkins and Klaus Baer of WRJ Design. Inspired by the natural beauty that surrounds its Jackson headquarters, the firm is known for imparting the special harmony and serenity of its Teton setting to interior designs in Jackson Hole and across the country. WRJ also designed the exterior facade and floor plan of rooms for the WDC Designer Show House in collaboration with JLF & Associates and Big-D Signature.

The great room of the show house will be designed by Terry and Claudia Winchell of Fighting Bear Antiques, who specialize in furnishings by Thomas Molesworth, rustic furniture, American Indian beadwork, Navajo rugs and textiles, and other fine antiques. The Winchells’ expertise includes discovering special historical Western pieces by early craftsmen whose work now serves as inspiration for some of the WDC’s contemporary functional artists.

“The participating interior designers were allowed to choose the function of their rooms in the Designer Show House and incorporate pieces from WDC juried artists,” explains Merritt, “so this year’s setting includes two dining rooms.” One dining room will feature the work of EK Reedy Interiors. Believing that interiors are an expression of beauty and performance, EK Reedy founder Katherine Reedy takes her years of New York experience and applies her design processes to the vast spaces in Wyoming and around the country. Forsyth & Brown will also design a dining room for the WDC. For more than 18 years partners Jodi Forsyth and Amy Brown have been designing homes for a highly discerning national clientele as well as working locally in Shooting Star and the Jackson Hole Four Seasons.

The show house’s bedroom will be designed by Victoria Scarlett Interior Designs. With more than 25 years of experience in both commercial and residential design, Victoria Scarlett has managed the production and installation of projects all over the world. And Xssentials, a Jackson Hole firm known for designing home technology solutions and automated systems, will create a music room to complete the floor plan. The Western Design Conference Designer Show House is sponsored by LintonBingle Associate Brokers and Spring Creek Ranch, as well as by all of the participating interior design firms.

The Western Design Conference Opening Preview Party and Ward + Blake Architects-sponsored Fashion Show take place Sept. 10, 2015, at the Snow King Center. The WDC continues Sept. 11 –13 with the Western Design Conference Exhibit + Sale, the Designer Show House, and Retail Row shopping. Three-day passes for the Exhibit + Sale are $15; tickets for the Opening Preview Party, Live Auction and Fashion Show are $50/person; $125/person for limited reserved seating. For tickets, visit http://westerndesignconference.com/events/.

About the Western Design Conference:
The 23rd annual Western Design Conference Exhibit + Sale is a four-day, multimillion-dollar event that brings together craftspeople, collectors, interior designers, architects and fashion designers with a love of the West, sponsored by Mountain Living magazine. The Western Design Conference was founded 23 years ago in Cody, Wyo., as a way to promote contemporary artists working in historical American craft methods. The WDC moved to Jackson in 2007. Allison Merritt, who purchased the WDC in 2014, after seven years acting as event manager, continues the strong commitment to Western arts in Wyoming while expanding the reach of the show. From documented American craft, to home design, to couture fashion, the show encompasses all aspects of the best of Western design. Additional information on the WDC, including schedules and tickets, is available at www.westerndesignconference.com and on Facebook and Twitter @WesternDesign.

Collectors Circle Helps National Museum of Wildlife Art Acquire New Works

NMWA Collectors CircleIn our 2015 issue of Homestead, we profiled the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Rungius Society and Collectors Circle, two social organizations that play a large role in furthering the goals of the museum, all while providing a chance to socialize with fellow arts aficionados from around the valley and elsewhere. This month, one of the museum’s most significant donor events of the year will take place for the 17th annual time. We look forward to learning about the new pieces that will enter the museum’s permanent collection as a direct result of the Collector Circle’s philanthropy! Learn more below.

COLLECTORS CIRCLE HELPS MUSEUM ACQUIRE NEW WORKS AT FUN 17TH ANNUAL DINNER

The National Museum of Wildlife Art will host the 17th annual Collectors Circle dinner, Wednesday, August 19. The Collectors Circle membership society has been instrumental in growing the museum’s permanent collection since its inception in 1998.

The works purchased by the Circle represent the broader collecting goals of the museum. Included are paintings, sculptures, and prints ranging from historic masterworks to the best in contemporary art. All acquisitions further the museum’s mission and vision by furthering the investigation of humanity’s relationship with nature.

During the course of the year, the museum’s curatorial team identifies a range of artwork that would benefit the collection. The artwork is vetted by the Museum’s Collections Committee before being presented to members of the Collectors Circle. During the special August 19 evening event, the Circle gathers to view the artworks on display, deliberate the merits of each piece, and choose which pieces to purchase in the name of Collectors Circle.

“There is always more artwork available than there are funds to spend, which leads to spirited debate and politicking,” says Debbie Petersen, National Museum of Wildlife Art Collection Committee Chair. “It’s a really fun, festive event where guests can vote on artwork they feel will have the greatest impact on the collection. The pieces with the most votes are accessioned into the Permanent Collection as gifts of the Collectors Circle. I hope to see many of our members and also new friends at the event August 19.”

To date, the Circle has helped acquire close to 100 works of art for the museum’s collection ranging from explorer-artist Titian Ramsay Peale’s “Three Elk” to Andy Warhol’s “Endangered Species” portfolio. Last year, eight pieces were purchased or donated during the course of the evening, including works by John James Audubon, Albert Bierstadt, and the final sculpture to complete the installation of Todd McGrain’s Lost Bird project on the outdoor Sculpture Trail.

For tickets and to learn more about the event, please contact, Jocelyn Boss at 307-732-5447, jboss@wildlifeart.org

Plein Air in Grand Teton National Park

Detail of John Scott, Plein Air in the Park

Detail of John Scott, Plein Air in the Park

What do you get when you cross a magical setting with those who are able to dispense magic via pigment? The 4th Annual Plein Air in the Park event!

In partnership with the Grand Teton Association and the Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters, both local and visiting artists tramp into the superlative outdoors of Grand Teton National Park to set up their easels and hearken back to the authentic tradition of open air “wet painting.” These painters got started in the area on July 6, and tomorrow, July 15, a selection of their work will be displayed at the Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center in Moose, WY. If you’re looking to add a truly one-of-a-kind memento of Jackson Hole to your collection, this is a wonderful place to start. Even better, 40% of the profits from all painting sales directly benefit the Grand Teton Association and their admirable free educational, interpretive, and scientific programs in the national park.

Kathryn Mapes Turner painting in Grand Teton National Park.

Kathryn Mapes Turner painting in Grand Teton National Park.

Our publisher, Latham Jenkins, recently made it into the field to observe these artists in action–truly, en plein air. First, he spoke with artist John Cook of Louisville, TX, who is a 2013 recipient of Best in Show honors from the American Impressionist Society. A first-time participant in the show, he says he’s “Never seen such beauty,” when contemplating the Tetons. As the light shifted over the course of the day, he painted 10 separate paintings on the same canvas.

We also caught up with the always-eloquent Kathryn Mapes Turner, whom we’ve profiled on the blog before. Represented by Trio Fine Art, Turner has a new show opening there on July 29th called “Here. Now.” Hear her thoughts and learn more about the way that Plein Air in the Park catalyzes artistic inspiration and philanthropy in our beloved backyard.