Heather James Fine Art (And More!) at Palates & Palettes Tonight

Penelope Gottlieb

Penelope Gottlieb

Along with other esteemed local galleries including Altamira Fine Art, WRJ Design, and Tayloe Piggott Gallery, Heather James Fine Art is participating in the free, public Palates & Palettes Art Walk this evening. A favorite event of the annual Fall Arts Festival, we encourage art lovers from near and far to visit the Jackson Town Square from 5-8 tonight to partake. In concert with artist Rocky Hawkins, whom we covered on the blog last week, Heather James has another delightful showing up its sleeve. Here are the details below:

Heather James Fine Art is pleased to present a solo exhibition by Penelope Gottlieb. The exhibition will be on view at our Jackson, Wyoming gallery until September 25, 2014.The opening reception will take place at Heather James Fine Art, Jackson, WY on Friday, September 5, 2014 from 5 – 8 PM with the artist in attendance. Also on Friday evening, Heather James Fine Art, Jackson, WY is pleased to be participating in Palates+Palettes, hosting with The Indian. Please join us for this festive event and enjoy magnificent art with food and wine. For more information, please contact Jim Carona.

About the Artist

Penelope Gottlieb’s paintings use John James Audobon’s nature prints as a discourse on the commoditization of the natural world in the 19th century. Painting over preexisting Audubon prints, Gottlieb adds plant life winding around the featured animal as if the creature’s natural habitat has stifled them in a botanical confinement. The resulting blend of historical documentation of avian species with the invasion of plant-life creates a contemporary view on the original intent of the prints. Gottlieb’s marking over the prints acts as an additional invasion on top of her ecological critique of the artistic consumption of nature.

Penelope Gottlieb received her BFA from Art Center College of Design, Pasadena, CA and her MFA from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her work has been shown in solo exhibitions at Lotusland, Montecito, CA; Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, NV; Heather James Fine Art, Palm Desert, CA; Lightbox Gallery, Los Angeles, CA, and at the Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum among others. Additionally, her work
??has been included in group exhibitions at the Peggy Phelps Gallery, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA; Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL, and the Ben Maltz Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, CA among others.

Heather James Fine Art is located at 172 Center Street in Jackson and is home to an international fine art collection spanning thousands of years. With galleries located in Palm Desert, CA and Jackson, WY, Heather James Fine Art presents a leading collection of celebrated pieces from antiquity to contemporary. For more information about the gallery and upcoming exhibitions, please visit our website at http://www.heatherjames.com or contact the gallery at 307-200-6090.

The Fall Arts Festival is Here! Week One Itinerary

Palates & Palettes Gallery Walk; Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival

Palates & Palettes Gallery Walk; Tayloe Piggott Gallery

The Fall Arts Festival is back, ushering in a jam-packed week-and-a-half of visual, contemporary, culinary, Western, landscape, wildlife, and Native American arts. In short: it’s a festival of toasting Jackson Hole’s incredibly diverse artistic community, its fall colors, its cuisine, and all the dedicated professionals that add to the vibrancy of our valley. But where to start? With over 50 events occurring between September 3-14, we’ve gone through and picked out some fetes that are sure to be winners. However, we encourage you to check back frequently on the Fall Arts Festival’s Facebook page for ongoing event details. Each and every day, galleries are hosting talks, openings, and parties, so please make sure to check if your favorite one is on the list.

Here’s our list for this week:


From the kick-off luncheon on September 3rd throughout the rest of the Fest, the Western Visions Annual Show & Sale overlaps with its own events and chances to purchase world-class art. This is the major fundraiser every year for the National Museum of Wildlife Art, and needs be on your radar! (August 30-September 21).

Don’t forget to pick up a collector’s item souvenir during your Fall Arts Festival experience! This year, two bottles of wine are featured, both with labels designed by the two artists highlighted during the fest, Nancy Cawdrey and Joshua Tobey. They can be purchased at The Liquor Store & Wine Loft.

Thursday, September 4

It’s a day of jewelry, with the Western Visions Jewelry & Design Luncheon beginning at 11am at Snow King Resort. Meanwhile, Two Grey Hills will be hosting award-winning and contemporary Hopi jewelry artist Duane Maktima in their galleries until 6pm.

Friday, September 5

From 2-8pm, the Jackson Hole Historical Society & Museum reminds us of the valley’s heritage with a folk and traditional arts fair including demonstrations and sales of frontier and homestead crafts and skills. Featured crafts include cinch and saddle pad making, hooked rugs, rope making, quilting, and other ranch and domestic arts. 225 N. Cache Street (Museum Gallery)

Most importantly, reserve your evening for the immensely popular Palates & Palettes Gallery Walk. Running from 5-8pm at a huge range of galleries, this event involves a delicious pairing between top-notch restaurants from throughout Jackson with gallery spaces, resulting in the perfect food/art crawl. We encourage you to check the Fall Arts page for the full list of participating galleries, which include Heather James Fine Art, Altamira, Tayloe Piggott, WRJ Design, and many more. We guarantee that all will have something special in store.

Saturday, September 6

The perfect companion to our Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes the following weekend, Historic Ranch Tours allow visitors to experience a side of Jackson Hole that is normally hidden from the public view. The tour is complete with cowboys, Western entertainment, and a good old fashioned barbecue, and is hosted by Mountain Living magazine. It begins at 2pm, costs $50, and can be booked through the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce.

Sunday, September 7

Make sure to head to Jackson’s Town Square on Sunday for a full-day of gourmet delight and al fresco community art!

From 10am-4pm, the 15th Annual Takin’ It to the Streets represents an open-air, juried art fair featuring 40 local artists–including some of Jackson’s finest–selling an array of artwork. Presented by the Art Association of Jackson Hole.

Then, from 11am-4pm, The Taste of the Tetons brings together valley chefs, restaurants, and caterers for an open-air tasting fair. Taste tickets cost a scant $1, and attendees will be serenaded by live music while dabbling in a wine tasting and silent auction (see below). Always a favorite!

In partnership with the other two events,the Rotary Supper Club’s Fall Arts Festival Wine Tasting & Silent Auction rounds out your downtown day with their wine tasting and auction benefitting the community through scholarships and sponsorships. Taste tickets are $1, and the event runs from 11am-5pm.

Lastly, 4 artists and artisans will be on hand at RARE Gallery from 12pm-5pm. Patricia Griffin will be painting while overlooking the Town Square; Petra Class Trunk Show will have her latest custom pieces on display; Dan Burgette will be showing his award-winning avian carvings; and Trenton Higley and his most recent Yellowstone paintings will be in attendance. 12pm-5pm

Stay tuned for the rest of our event recommendations!

Heather James Fine Art Hosting Rocky Hawkins Opening on September 5

"ORBITRON v28" by Rocky Hawkins

“ORBITRON v28” by Rocky Hawkins

We can’t wait for the Fall Arts Festival to kick off next week! One of the early events on our roster of must-see’s is the following exciting exhibit and opening at Heather James Fine Art. Please check out the details below:

Heather James Fine Art is pleased to present an exhibition of Rocky Hawkins: Keep the Spirit. Hawkins, a popular artist in Jackson, WY, has been greatly missed in the local art scene and Heather James Fine Art is excited to bring him and his art back to the local community. The opening reception takes place on September 5, 2014 and the artist will be in attendance. The show runs the duration of the Fall Arts Festival. For more information, please contact James Carona.

Information About the Artist:

Bringing a refreshing approach to traditional subjects, Rocky Hawkins’ art explores the intersection of Modern stylistic influences in the context of Native American genre painting. Drawing on his lifelong appreciation of Native American culture, the artist produces vibrant, gestural images inviting the viewer to examine their own reactions to his work. Of his work, Hawkins explains, “My paintings are about expressing a visual experience that challenges and communicates with a sense of mystery in hopes to awaken the senses.” Hawkins’ inspiration from the Abstract Expressionists is apparent in his work as raw emotion is masterfully captured in his subjects that blend into textured abstraction in a vivid color palette.

Well established as a leading American artist, Rocky Hawkins’ career has spanned over three decades and includes extensive accolades and exhibitions. After studying fine art at the Burnley School of Professional Art (now Art Institute) in Seattle, Hawkins moved to Montana where he focused his art on expressing Native American spirituality and identity. Hawkins has gained recognition throughout Jackson for his paintings representing a fresh take of the West. His newest body of work incorporates pure abstractions with the artists’ own photography-melding, toying with the viewers’ ideas of what is reality while moving away from his past inspirations to play out a new story.

Heather James Fine Art is located at 172 Center Street, Suite 101 in Jackson, WY and maintains a collection of art from various genres including Impressionist and Modern art, Post-War and Contemporary, American, Latin American, Old Master, Photography and Design. For more information about the gallery and upcoming exhibitions, please visit www.heatherjames.com or contact the gallery at 307-200- 6090.

A Range of Masters Currently Hanging at Heather James Fine Art

Jackson Hole enjoys a reputation as one of the premier small arts communities in the country, but even here, the chance to glimpse a canvas by the likes of Van Gogh or Norman Rockwell are slim. Even more unique is the chance to see the juxtaposition of these artists hanging side-by-side on gallery walls–from Impressionists to cutting edge contemporary masters. Don’t miss the opportunity to experience this momentous group exhibition, hanging July through September at Heather James Fine Art! More information and selected artist bios are below.

Robert Townsend,

Heather James Fine Art’s presentation of European and American Masters includes such luminaries as Van Gogh, Bierstadt, Tissot, Grandma Moses, Calder, and Hirst hanging in dialogue with one another. The impressive group exhibition encompasses multiple genres primarily from Modern and Contemporary, California Impressionism, and American art canons. Highlights of the exhibition were created by significant painters such as E. Charlton Fortune, Vincent Van Gogh, Norman Rockwell, and Damien Hirst.

E. Charlton Fortune (1885-1969) is one of the most sought-after California Impressionists. Her painting “Picking Apples,” 1920-1921 is one of Fortune’s most appealing pieces due to its classic Impressionist style of thick brush strokes and warm palette.

Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902) is one of the most well-known landscape painters of the American West. A striking monochrome grisaille, oil on canvas, “Moonlight in Yosemite,” is set in Bierstadt’s beloved Yosemite Valley. The painting depicts a calm dark lake surrounded by soaring mountains shrouded in fog and lit by the moon.

Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) was an iconic post-Impressionist who changed art history using his gestural brush strokes and vibrant palette. Van Gogh painted “Le Moulin” in 1881 when he was only 27. One of only two windmill paintings by Van Gogh, this early piece contains a muted palette of greens and grays.

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) is known for chronicling quintessential American scenes. In his 12 Boy Scouts of America Drawing, the charcoal and pen drawing contains a grid of scenes representing the twelve virtues of the Boy Scouts.

Damien Hirst (b. 1965) is a British contemporary artist recognized for his paintings, medicine cabinet sculptures, and glass tank installations. Hirst’s Spot paintings are an arrangement of color spots with titles that refer to pharmaceutical chemicals. Hirst’s Spin paintings are created by centrifugal force, where Hirst pours paint over spinning canvases. This exhibition contains both a Spot work on paper, “Aurous Iodide,” 2009 and a Spin painting, “Beautiful Andraste Frotteurism Painting,” 2011.

Heather James Fine Art is located at 172 Center Street, Suite 101 in Jackson, WY and maintains a collection of art from various genres including Impressionist and Modern art, Post-War and Contemporary, American, Latin American, Old Master, Photography and Design. For more information about the gallery and upcoming exhibitions, please visit www.heatherjames.com or contact the gallery at 307-200- 6090.For more information about this exhibit, please contact James Carona.

Mark Your July Calendars for “My Thin Place”

In our One Work blog post last autumn, we had the pleasure of speaking to Kathryn Mapes Turner regarding two of her large-scale paintings. We are now excited to spread the word about her upcoming show, “My Thin Place,” coming to Jackson this July. Kathryn very eloquently shares the impetus behind the show, and the concept of a “thin place” below. Read, enjoy, and be sure to catch the exhibition!

painting by Kathryn Mapes Turner

“Emergence of Fall”

A Thin Place
The title of this exhibition is derived from a Celtic term referring to a place where the boundary between the material world and the spiritual world is particularly thin. For Turner, the Greater Yellowstone Wilderness is a “thin place.”

Kathryn Turner had the good fortune of being born into a fourth generation ranching family in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. This ranch, located within what is now Grand Teton National Park, enjoys one of the most direct views of the Teton mountain range. Turner says, “Each day, for as long as I remember, I was greeted by those mountains. They are, in a very real way, a part of me. Early on, I felt the urge to find a way to express my passion for this ecosystem, and imagery became my lexicon for this song of appreciation. Ever since, I have devoted my craft to doing justice to the beauty of this landscape.

In belonging to a landscape in this way, I feel a rightness, an at-homeness where I am knitted to the world. This rootedness allows me to be present to what is- a practice the Buddhists refer to as mindfulness, and the contemplative Christians call recollection, and the Quakers call centering down. For me this experience is lived tactically where my nerve endings are bare against the land. As I take in the magnificence and scale of this landscape, I am moved beyond myself. I refer to the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem as my ‘thin place.’

This collection of paintings is about this relationship with the landscape. Rather than photo-realistic depictions, they are interpretations and impressions of what I experience when I am in the natural world. It is my hope that, for the viewer, the paintings are themselves a quiet meeting place between internal emotion and external stimuli, a meeting place of the material and non-material.”

Turner’s work has been recognized nationally by many top awards including “Best of Show” at the American Impressionist Society and the Rocky Mountain Plein Air Association. Her paintings have been exhibited at the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Museum, the National Museum of Wildlife Art, the Wyoming State Museum and the Charlie Russell Museum. SouthWest Art recognized Turner as “21 Young Artists with Promising Careers.”

Show Details:

“My Thin Place”
An Artist Exhibits Paintings Inspired by the Spirit of the Landscape
Trio Fine Art hosts an unprecedented exhibition of paintings by Kathryn Mapes Turner.

• July 9-26th, 2014
• Artist Reception July 17th 5-8 p.m., FREE and open to the public.
• Gallery hours Wednesday-Saturday noon-6 p.m.
• Exhibition can be viewed online at Trio Fine Art after July 5th, 2014

Jackson Hole Traveler: Ringholz Cover

Jackson Hole Traveler - Lodging, Restaurants and Things to DoPart and parcel with a content refresh, Homestead’s sister publication, Jackson Hole Traveler, received a re-size and redesign. Copies just hit the streets last week, and we’ve been fielding compliments regarding the beautiful cover painting ever since. Most local art connoisseurs will recognize “The Traveler” as an original Amy Ringholz painting–it captivates with an interpretation of local wildlife in distinctive, bright colors.

We chatted briefly with Amy to learn more about the painting and her upcoming shows and projects this year.

Tell us a little about the process of painting this work. What medium did you use?

The painting on the cover of the print magazine is called “The Traveler,” and this bear will make his first public appearance at my show on September 10, 2014 in Jackson Hole, called “Night Fenix.” This will be a lovely magical evening during the Fall Arts Festival where I will showcase twelve new works with a night theme running through the work and the event. This piece was made with several materials including charcoal, a spray paint, and then ink and oil paint. I find that by using mixed media, my work really has a chance to stand on its own. I love the colors I used in this bear, which make the painting have a cool feeling, and how the Snake River and the Tetons abstractly flow through the piece.

Ringholz in her studio.

Ringholz in her studio.

The bear is a part of the landscape. As we travel, we become a part of the landscape as well.

How do you express your relationship to Jackson Hole’s natural surroundings through paint? What’s unique about the community here?

Jackson Hole is usually heaven on earth. It is filled with drama in every direction– from the mountains to the incredible snowfall to the extreme weather to our gorgeous wildlife. There is nothing but inspiration in this valley to feed a painter’s mind and heart.

Do you have an activity or destination you would recommend to an art loving visitor to Jackson Hole?

If you love art, you want to be in Jackson in September during the Falls Art Fest. Being the third largest western art market in the country, this little town has not only been blessed with incredible beauty, but also incredible talent. The town fills up with shows and events and food tastings and wine pairings and artwork styles that suit every buyer. Everything from our craft fairs, to our restaurants, to our gallery walks will entertain and delight. The quality of work you will find in Jackson Hole will satisfy the creative hearts of people who love the west like we do.

What current projects or upcoming shows are you excited about?

I have my first solo museum show at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson on July 12, 2014! This is one of my biggest endeavors yet: creating a showing of 20 new works and then placing them into an installation so that every viewer will have a personal interaction with the artwork. I have tickets for sale up until the day of the event at ringholzstudios.com!

Being able to live in Jackson hole year round is gift enough, but to be able to create here and pursue my dreams is beyond my wildest imagination. I hope that everyone passing through our little town feels inspired to pursue their own creative dreams.

Check out one of Amy Ringholz’s shows for yourself!
Ringholz Show Flier

Fall In Love With Art At Two National Museum of Wildlife Art Events

In search of the perfect pre- and post-Valentine’s evenings out? Just mix art, atmosphere, music, and dining TONIGHT and next week at the National Museum of Wildlife Art. What’s not to love? Event details are below:

LION BEFORE STORM II © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

LION BEFORE STORM II © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

Mix’d Media This Evening!

Locals and visitors alike will enjoy an African safari experience in the heart of Jackson Hole with the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s February 13 installment of its popular second-Thursday-of-the-month evening Mix’d Media event. In addition to the opportunity to view the stunning, spare photographs of “Elegy: The African Photography of Nick Brandt 2001-2008” exhibition, which serves as a theme for the event, guests can dine and sip on East African-inspired food and gin and tonics – and try their hand at snipping cut paper silhouettes as the evening’s hands-on art activity. Screen Door Porch will provide live music accompaniment to the festivities. The event takes place from 6-9 p.m. on Thursday, February 13 at the museum. Cover charge is $5 for non-members, free for museum members.

The Mix’d Media event also provides the opportunity for attendees to preview the entries in Trophy Art: Fun Forms for All, all of which goes up for sale on a first-come, first-serve basis on February 22. We had a chance to view a selection of these new takes on traditional animal mounts ourselves. As no animals were harmed in their creation, the entries bridge a whimsical gap between representation and artistic interpretation. From a majestic moose antler taking flight in new form to a delicately hand-painted plaster skull, the trophies would all provide delightful additions to a residential or office wall.

“Deer Skull with Lily” by Jane Lavino is one of the mounts available for sale at the Trophy Art fundraiser.

“Deer Skull with Lily” by Jane Lavino is one of the mounts available for sale at the Trophy Art fundraiser.

Marvel at the selected trophies yourself:

With the tongue-in-cheek tagline “No animals died in the making of these mounts,” the National Museum of Wildlife Art will offer the public an opportunity to purchase unique wildlife-inspired “trophy art,” as well as learn how to decorate using the faux mounts and perhaps create their own “shed antler art” home furnishings from found pieces.

The museum’s new Trophy Art: Fun Forms for All fundraiser takes place February 22 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. with expert talks by interior designer Christy Fox, owner of Wilson Formal in Wilson, and artisan Kyle Anderson of Game Trail Gatherings in Jackson. To add to the fun, a hands-on art activity will be provided, and pizza by Caldera and desserts from Persephone Bakery will be available for tasting. Admission to the event is free and includes access to the Wapiti Gallery, Rising Sage Café and the Museum Shop (regular museum admission will be charged for entry to the rest of the museum galleries).

Having some fun with the misconception of some museum visitors that it displays wildlife taxidermy, the National Museum of Wildlife Art conceived its new Trophy Art fundraiser, soliciting wildlife trophy-inspired artworks from national, Jackson Hole area and even amateur artists. The works will be on display at the museum February 12 – March 15, and are available for sale on a first come, first served basis, beginning at the February 22 event. Proceeds benefit the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s youth education programs.

The schedule of events for the February 22 Trophy Art: Fun Forms for All, to be held in the museum’s Wapiti Gallery, is as follows:

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Christy Fox, owner of Wilson Formal, a shop specializing in art and home design, will answer questions and talk with visitors individually on the topic of “Bringing Wildlife Home – Design with Trophy Art.” Fox is known for her expertise in integrating art, conservation and a deep connection to the Jackson Hole region into her interior and artistic designs.

12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Grown-ups get to channel their inner child with an art activity that allows them to create their own mini-mounts, using multiple mediums for a take-home “trophy.”

1:30 – 2:00 p.m. Kyle Anderson of Game Trail Gatherings will demonstrate how he creates “truly unique home furnishings that transcend the ordinary experience,” using raw materials collected from the wild. Anderson will bring examples of both local and exotic “shed antler art” for his creations.

A member of the Association of Art Museum Directors and the Museums West consortium and accredited by the American Association of Museums, the museum, officially designated the National Museum of Wildlife Art of the United States by an act of Congress in 2008, provides an exciting calendar of exhibitions from its permanent collection and changing exhibitions from around the globe. A complete schedule of exhibitions and events is available online at www.wildlifeart.org. The museum is also active on Facebook and on Twitter at @WildlifeArtJH.

View22 Exhibition Opens This Week at Trio Fine Art!

Don’t miss the opening of View22 this Friday at Trio Fine Art! An opening reception for the show will be held from 5 to 8 pm on Friday, December 6th at Trio Fine Art, 545 North Cache, Jackson, WY (4 blocks north of the Town Square), with artists’ remarks at 6 pm.

The show will feature works from the View22: Painting Jackson Hole’s Open Spaces project, an inspired collaboration between the Jackson Hole Land Trust and Trio Fine Art launched this summer. The goal of View22 is to unite land conservation and the arts to cultivate a deeper sense of place in Jackson Hole. The project draws inspiration from artist Thomas Moran, whose paintings of the rugged beauty of the Yellowstone region captured the imagination of the country – and Congress – and played an important role in the establishment of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.

“As full-time landscape painters in Jackson Hole, we have a vital interest in the preservation of open space within our valley. It is the natural beauty found in wide open spaces that inspires our creativity. Through sharing our interpretations of the landscape, we hope to shine a spotlight on the importance of conservation efforts made possible by the Jackson Hole Land Trust,” said Kathryn Turner, Jennifer Hoffman, and Bill Sawczuk, the artists of Trio Fine Art.

Throughout the summer and fall of 2013, Kathryn Turner, Jennifer Hoffman, and Bill Sawczuk visited an iconic Land Trust protected property in the valley each week to paint “en plein air” and raise awareness of the importance of open space protection for the valley’s wildlife, community, and landscape artists. These experiences have been shared on the interactive View22 blog along with photos and histories of the properties, and with the community through several plein air demonstrations.

“We continue to be honored by the incredible commitment that these artists have shown to the View22 project,” said Laurie Andrews, executive director of the Jackson Hole Land Trust. “Through their deep understanding of how the valley’s protected open spaces affect their daily lives, and their talent and creativity, they’ve shown us all a very special view of our work.”

Eighteen Land Trust protected properties have been painted on location as part of the project. Finished works from these painting sessions will be on display at the Trio Fine Art gallery from December 6th through the 21st and online at Trio Fine Art and at Jackson Hole Land Trust after December 4th.

A new opportunity for watching the View22 artists in action has been added for this December at the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. The artists plan to paint the sweeping view from the top of the Bridger Gondola, from which over 20 Land Trust protected properties can be seen. Stay tuned for more details by early December.

A portion of the proceeds from the View22 show will benefit the Jackson Hole Land Trust. Please visit the View22 website or contact the Trio Fine Art Gallery at 307.734.4444 for more information about the show and opening reception.

About the Jackson Hole Land Trust
The Jackson Hole Land Trust is a private, non-profit organization that was established in 1980 to preserve open space and the critical wildlife habitat, magnificent scenic vistas, and historic ranching heritage of Jackson Hole. By working cooperatively with the owners of the area’s privately owned open lands, the Jackson Hole Land Trust has ensured the permanent protection of over 23,000 acres in and around Jackson Hole and the Greater Yellowstone Area.

About Trio Fine Art
Celebrating their seventh season, Trio Fine Art is a collaboration between three Jackson- based artists – Kathryn Mapes Turner, Jennifer L. Hoffman, and Bill Sawczuk. All three are deeply committed to depicting the landscape of the area through fine art. All three artists gain an intimate understanding of the land by working “en plein air” or on location all through the year. By working together, they have been able to earn the distinction of being one of Jackson’s most celebrated galleries specializing in landscape painting.

One Work

In this new series on the Homestead blog, we sit back and let Jackson Hole’s creative professionals become the storytellers. Each One Work blog entry is focused on the genesis, production, and meaning behind one significant local piece. During our conversations with artists, designers, and other creatives, we invite you to learn more about craftsmanship and the artistic process. Discover what it takes to make One Work.



Walk into the Trio Fine Art gallery and there they are: two towering, silvery canvases dominating an entire slender wall. The paired aspens paintings, Cathedral 1 & Cathedral 2, stop one right in one’s tracks.

“Are they meant to be a pair?”

Apparently, Kathryn Mapes Turner gets this question a lot. We’re in the gallery she co-owns with Jennifer L. Hoffman and Bill Sawczuk, and as she relays the story of how these two stunning works moved from concept to finished paintings, we sip tea and stare upwards, focused in on the flecks of ghostly paint.

Each painting has been composed on the monumental scale of 4×8 feet, and although, in fact, they do not have to be sold as a diptych, their effect together certainly adds to the drama of the wall.

Turner mainly paints plein air canvases and field studies, which necessarily call for a smaller space capable of recording the transitory impressions of nature. She notes that working from her studio allows for more interpretation and the ability to change the scale—in this case, to a soaring eight feet.

Kathryn Turner stands to the left, explaining her process.

Kathryn Turner stands to the left, explaining her process.

In a fashion, Cathedrals 1 & 2 follow a progression of working styles for Turner, who is a life-long painter and local—she grew up on the Triangle X Ranch, one of the oldest continuously operating ranches in Jackson Hole. She herself began with watercolors, which she says “taught [her] the aspect of spontaneity.” In the delicate interplay between water and the tincture of pigment, skill and happy accident find the ideal marriage.

“It’s almost a dance you have with the paint.”

As Turner transitioned to working in oil paints and the larger window of work time they allowed, a premium paper company called Arches began producing a new paper on a large scale. Struck by the notion of combining two separate yet equally rewarding painting approaches, Turner’s thoughts turned to a large canvas, the largest she’d ever painted. She decided to approach this oil painting more like a watercolor, and yet still painting in oil, she’d have more time to experiment. Oil is also the longer-wearing medium, allowing the dual canvases to take shape through a combination of ephemeral brushstrokes and more lasting swirls.


Looking closely at the canvas, one immediately notices its uniquely textured backdrop and almost charcoal metallic hue. This texture came about from embracing just a little bit of chaos. First, Turner mixed up big buckets of paint with heavy doses of water. At this point, she allowed the paint to drip down the entire length of both canvases. As the force of gravity pulled the paint downwards, the pigments of the paint separated and reacted with the watery solvent. “The fun happens when you let the paint do its thing,” Turner says. It’s a sense of adventure and “wait and see” that she brought to the entire project.

What led to the unique titles of Cathedrals 1 & 2? “When I’m in an aspen grove, I feel like I’m in a cathedral. I was driven to do something that would have that same feeling.” The subject also dictated the height of the dual pieces. Aspens are Turner’s favorite trees, and their vertical elegance was a feeling she wanted to duplicate in the impact of her paintings. “I wanted to make them more tree-like.”

The constellations and disturbance of the paint splotches one can observe when up- close-and-personal with the canvases also came about from allowing the paint to drip. While she painted the Cathedrals, Turner had both canvases laid out flat on the floor. A little dripping was inevitable, and quite beautiful.

Up Close

“Process is what teaches us what we need to know,” Turner says.

In terms of process, the framing of Cathedrals 1 & 2 proved the trickiest and most demanding aspect of the creation. The stark black float frames are sold with the pieces, and are designed so that the edges do not obscure any part of the actual painting. These visibly rough and torn edges add even more delightful texture and visual interest to the two ethereal paintings. Attaching the long, thin canvases to the backboard meant dabbling in permanent glue, so there was quite literally only one chance to get the alignment right. With a team of friends and a lot of research, Turner attempted—and succeeded—in the difficult framing.



It was all worth it, too, as the lack of glass dispels any separation between the paintings and the viewer. As Turner knows, these are the sort of works that beg to be scrutinized; often viewers even put out a tentative hand to touch them, catching themselves and stopping before going any further.

She’s glad of the varying reactions and inquiries she’s received regarding the paintings so far, explaining that, “when art inspires different reactions it makes it more compelling.”

As for Turner, she knows these two singular paintings are something that can’t be replicated—not by look or feel or the many serendipitous experiments that led to their completion. For everyone who sees them, whether once or repeatedly, they are pieces with their own place in time, history, and experience. Landscape painters know well the ineffable and mutable subject that endlessly fascinates them.

“I could never do this again,” Turner laughs. “That’s what art is.”

Visit Cathedrals 1 & 2 yourself during the upcoming View 22 event hosted by Trio Fine Art on Dec. 6 from 5-8pm. You can also contact Kathryn Mapes Turner at kathryn@turnerfineart.com and view samples of her other work at Turner Fine Art.

Design for a Cause: WRJ Design Associates Teams Up for the (RED) Auction in NYC

On November 23rd, Rush Jenkins and Klaus Baer of WRJ Design Associates will be unveiling an exhibit they designed in partnership with Sotheby’s New York. The unique and star-studded affair brings together work curated by two impresarios of the design world—Jony Ive and Marc Newson—in support of Product (RED), an organization helmed by Bono. All of the proceeds from Jony and Marc’s (RED) Auction will then be donated to the Global Fund to provide AIDS relief in Africa.

Past (RED) auctions have been curated by the likes of celebrity artist Damien Hirst. This time, Bono approached two arbiters of minimalist, almost futuristic design–most famous for designing products that we love to covet and use. Jony Ive is the designer responsible for the look of the iPhone, iPad, and Macbook Air, while Marc Newson has brought his trademark sleek aesthetic to everything from airplanes to furniture and clothing. In collaboration, the two have designed two brand-new pieces for the (RED) exhibition—a Neal Feay desk and custom-made Leica M camera. They have also curated a beautiful and wide-ranging collection of over 40 ingeniously designed products, many tricked out with red detailing in honor of the auction’s theme.

Here is a sampling of the one-of-kind pieces from Sotheby’s (RED) catalogue:

The (RED) Desk, designed by Jony Ive & Marc Newson

With such a pedigree of design talent behind the show and such startling pieces to be displayed, WRJ Design Associates drew on their years of exhibition design experience to create the appropriate setting for this special event. As favored designers at Sotheby’s, the team has designed past exhibitions for the private collections of The Kennedy Family Homes, Johnny Cash, and Versace, among many others. This time, working closely with Sotheby’s, they are excited to craft a memorable visual experience for patrons attending the landmark (RED) auction.

“WRJ Design is delighted to be a part of this historic auction. We have a long standing partnership with Sotheby’s as their preferred design firm; creating a variety of high profile exhibitions and auctions. (RED) strikes the balance of cutting edge innovation and high quality craftsmanship and we are excited to participate.” –Rush Jenkins, CEO of WRJ Design Associates

In what is sure to be an event combining the best of groundbreaking design, celebrity flair, and philanthropy, the (RED) Auction is yet another event where local firm WRJ is making its mark. We encourage our readers to check it out and learn more.