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Fall Arts Festival: Week Two Itinerary

Fall Arts FestivalThe Fall Arts Festival is back, ushering in a jam-packed week-and-a-half of visual, contemporary, culinary, Western, landscape, wildlife, and Native American arts. In short: it’s a festival of toasting Jackson Hole’s incredibly diverse artistic community, its fall colors, its cuisine, and all the dedicated professionals that add to the vibrancy of our valley. But where to start? With over 50 events occurring between September 3-14, we’ve gone through and picked out some fetes that are sure to be winners. However, we encourage you to check back frequently on the Fall Arts Festival’s Facebook page for ongoing event details. Each and every day, galleries are hosting talks, openings, and parties, so please make sure to check if your favorite one is on the list.

Here’s our list for this week:

Ongoing

From the kick-off luncheon on September 3rd throughout the rest of the Fest, the Western Visions Annual Show & Sale overlaps with its own events and chances to purchase world-class art. This is the major fundraiser every year for the National Museum of Wildlife Art, and needs be on your radar! (August 30-September 21).

Don’t forget to pick up a collector’s item souvenir during your Fall Arts Festival experience! This year, two bottles of wine are featured, both with labels designed by the two artists highlighted during the fest, Nancy Cawdrey and Joshua Tobey. They can be purchased at The Liquor Store & Wine Loft.

Wednesday, September 30

Head downtown for poster signings with the Fall Arts Festival’s featured artists. From 3-5pm, sculptor Joshua Tobey will be signing at Astoria Fine Art, and painter Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey at West Lives on Contemporary.

The best part of Fall Arts Festival? Lots of gallery time! Occurring from 5-8pm on the Town Square, Wednesday provides another opportunity to art walk throughout downtown while enjoying face time with gallery owners and artists, refreshments, and the astounding diversity of Jackson Hole’s art scene. With more than 30 galleries participating, look for Art Walk banners as you explore town.

Artist’s Receptions & Exhibit Openings: Featured artists Tom Gilleon, Howard Post, Glenn Dean, Ed Mell, and Greg Woodard will be at Altamira Fine Art from 5-8pm, while across town, the “In Our Valley” exhibition by Trio Fine Art will show gallery owners’ Kathryn Mapes Turner, Jennifer L. Hoffman,and Bill Sawczuk’s soulful painted interpretations of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

An issue of JH Traveler.As evening blends to night, be sure to make an appearance at The Night Fenix, a celebration for Fall Arts Festival 2012 featured artist Amy Ringholz. Not only will Amy be revealing 12 beautiful new works (including “The Traveler,” which graces the cover of our sister publication Jackson Hole Traveler), but there will be live music, coffee treats, cocktails, and ample revelry for all. (125 N. Cache; 5-11pm).

Thursday, September 11

From 5:30-8:30pm, the National Museum of Wildlife Art hosts the Wild 100 Artist party, a chance to celebrate and place bids before the Western Visions gala show and sale tomorrow. $100; registration required.

Friday, September 12

From 11am-4pm, our Homestead team is proud to be hosting the Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes, self-guided tours of Jackson Hole’s most spectacular homes with the potential to chat with the artisans, designers, and architects behind them. Tickets are $75 and include wine and hors d’oeuvres–all proceeds go to charities selected by our homeowners. Buy tickets in advance at http://jacksonholeshowcase.com.

The Wild 100 Show & Sale represents the final opportunity to bid on Western Visions works, as well as a shindig to follow. $150; registration required.

From 10am-7pm, swing by the landmark Center for the Arts to preview works in the Jackson Hole Art Auction. This event represents a true motherlode for any arts lover, with genres including contemporary, classic, Western, sporting, and wildlife all represented.

You’ve seen their work hanging on gallery walls; now, peek behind the scenes into the artists’ studios and get to know the charming area of Wilson, Wyoming during the West Bank Artists Studio Tour. Call 307-733-5096 for more information.

Saturday, September 13

Kick off your morning with a splash of paint (and excitement!). At 9am on the Town Square, the Jackson Hole Quick Draw art sale and auction begins. While a crowd of onlookers observe, artists paint new masterpieces in 90 minutes, followed by an auction that benefits the 2015 Fall Arts Festival.

The Jackson Hole Art Auction gets going at noon at the Center for the Arts! Preview the works beginning at 9am.

The Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes runs for a second day from 11am-4pm!

Toast the Fall Arts Festival and rub shoulders with artists and other arts patrons at the Fall Arts Festival artist party from 5-8pm on the Town Square. Live music and the chance to meet the Festival’s two featured artists–as well as a reception for artists from West Lives On and Astoria Fine Art–make this a fun and festive event to ring in the end of the Festival.

Sunday, September 14

You didn’t think you could leave the Fall Arts Festival without one more gallery tour, did you? In this unique spin on the traditional art walk, galleries throughout downtown open their doors from 11am-3pm and lure art lovers in one last time for delectable brunch dishes and themed beverages.

Last thing on the itinerary? Take a nap! That’s a lot of amazing arts programming in one week, all thanks to the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival’s continually evolving and expanding reach.

The Fall Arts Festival is Here! Week One Itinerary

Palates & Palettes Gallery Walk; Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival

Palates & Palettes Gallery Walk; Tayloe Piggott Gallery

The Fall Arts Festival is back, ushering in a jam-packed week-and-a-half of visual, contemporary, culinary, Western, landscape, wildlife, and Native American arts. In short: it’s a festival of toasting Jackson Hole’s incredibly diverse artistic community, its fall colors, its cuisine, and all the dedicated professionals that add to the vibrancy of our valley. But where to start? With over 50 events occurring between September 3-14, we’ve gone through and picked out some fetes that are sure to be winners. However, we encourage you to check back frequently on the Fall Arts Festival’s Facebook page for ongoing event details. Each and every day, galleries are hosting talks, openings, and parties, so please make sure to check if your favorite one is on the list.

Here’s our list for this week:

Ongoing

From the kick-off luncheon on September 3rd throughout the rest of the Fest, the Western Visions Annual Show & Sale overlaps with its own events and chances to purchase world-class art. This is the major fundraiser every year for the National Museum of Wildlife Art, and needs be on your radar! (August 30-September 21).

Don’t forget to pick up a collector’s item souvenir during your Fall Arts Festival experience! This year, two bottles of wine are featured, both with labels designed by the two artists highlighted during the fest, Nancy Cawdrey and Joshua Tobey. They can be purchased at The Liquor Store & Wine Loft.

Thursday, September 4

It’s a day of jewelry, with the Western Visions Jewelry & Design Luncheon beginning at 11am at Snow King Resort. Meanwhile, Two Grey Hills will be hosting award-winning and contemporary Hopi jewelry artist Duane Maktima in their galleries until 6pm.

Friday, September 5

From 2-8pm, the Jackson Hole Historical Society & Museum reminds us of the valley’s heritage with a folk and traditional arts fair including demonstrations and sales of frontier and homestead crafts and skills. Featured crafts include cinch and saddle pad making, hooked rugs, rope making, quilting, and other ranch and domestic arts. 225 N. Cache Street (Museum Gallery)

Most importantly, reserve your evening for the immensely popular Palates & Palettes Gallery Walk. Running from 5-8pm at a huge range of galleries, this event involves a delicious pairing between top-notch restaurants from throughout Jackson with gallery spaces, resulting in the perfect food/art crawl. We encourage you to check the Fall Arts page for the full list of participating galleries, which include Heather James Fine Art, Altamira, Tayloe Piggott, WRJ Design, and many more. We guarantee that all will have something special in store.

Saturday, September 6

The perfect companion to our Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes the following weekend, Historic Ranch Tours allow visitors to experience a side of Jackson Hole that is normally hidden from the public view. The tour is complete with cowboys, Western entertainment, and a good old fashioned barbecue, and is hosted by Mountain Living magazine. It begins at 2pm, costs $50, and can be booked through the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce.

Sunday, September 7

Make sure to head to Jackson’s Town Square on Sunday for a full-day of gourmet delight and al fresco community art!

From 10am-4pm, the 15th Annual Takin’ It to the Streets represents an open-air, juried art fair featuring 40 local artists–including some of Jackson’s finest–selling an array of artwork. Presented by the Art Association of Jackson Hole.

Then, from 11am-4pm, The Taste of the Tetons brings together valley chefs, restaurants, and caterers for an open-air tasting fair. Taste tickets cost a scant $1, and attendees will be serenaded by live music while dabbling in a wine tasting and silent auction (see below). Always a favorite!

In partnership with the other two events,the Rotary Supper Club’s Fall Arts Festival Wine Tasting & Silent Auction rounds out your downtown day with their wine tasting and auction benefitting the community through scholarships and sponsorships. Taste tickets are $1, and the event runs from 11am-5pm.

Lastly, 4 artists and artisans will be on hand at RARE Gallery from 12pm-5pm. Patricia Griffin will be painting while overlooking the Town Square; Petra Class Trunk Show will have her latest custom pieces on display; Dan Burgette will be showing his award-winning avian carvings; and Trenton Higley and his most recent Yellowstone paintings will be in attendance. 12pm-5pm

Stay tuned for the rest of our event recommendations!

Heather James Fine Art Hosting Rocky Hawkins Opening on September 5

"ORBITRON v28" by Rocky Hawkins

“ORBITRON v28” by Rocky Hawkins

We can’t wait for the Fall Arts Festival to kick off next week! One of the early events on our roster of must-see’s is the following exciting exhibit and opening at Heather James Fine Art. Please check out the details below:

Heather James Fine Art is pleased to present an exhibition of Rocky Hawkins: Keep the Spirit. Hawkins, a popular artist in Jackson, WY, has been greatly missed in the local art scene and Heather James Fine Art is excited to bring him and his art back to the local community. The opening reception takes place on September 5, 2014 and the artist will be in attendance. The show runs the duration of the Fall Arts Festival. For more information, please contact James Carona.

Information About the Artist:

Bringing a refreshing approach to traditional subjects, Rocky Hawkins’ art explores the intersection of Modern stylistic influences in the context of Native American genre painting. Drawing on his lifelong appreciation of Native American culture, the artist produces vibrant, gestural images inviting the viewer to examine their own reactions to his work. Of his work, Hawkins explains, “My paintings are about expressing a visual experience that challenges and communicates with a sense of mystery in hopes to awaken the senses.” Hawkins’ inspiration from the Abstract Expressionists is apparent in his work as raw emotion is masterfully captured in his subjects that blend into textured abstraction in a vivid color palette.

Well established as a leading American artist, Rocky Hawkins’ career has spanned over three decades and includes extensive accolades and exhibitions. After studying fine art at the Burnley School of Professional Art (now Art Institute) in Seattle, Hawkins moved to Montana where he focused his art on expressing Native American spirituality and identity. Hawkins has gained recognition throughout Jackson for his paintings representing a fresh take of the West. His newest body of work incorporates pure abstractions with the artists’ own photography-melding, toying with the viewers’ ideas of what is reality while moving away from his past inspirations to play out a new story.

Heather James Fine Art is located at 172 Center Street, Suite 101 in Jackson, WY and maintains a collection of art from various genres including Impressionist and Modern art, Post-War and Contemporary, American, Latin American, Old Master, Photography and Design. For more information about the gallery and upcoming exhibitions, please visit www.heatherjames.com or contact the gallery at 307-200- 6090.

Buzz is Building for the Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes!

Check out this press release from the Fall Arts Festival about our upcoming event:

Showcase of Homes Tour Reveals the Art of Living Spaces in Jackson
Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival event opens doors on exclusive homes and ranches

Fall Arts Fest Showcase of Homes

“Shooting Star Elegance” (left) and “River Meadows Retreat” (right) are two of the homes to be featured in the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival’s Showcase of Homes Tour.

Jackson, Wyoming – August 22, 2014 – The art of Jackson Hole home design has become an integral part of the annual Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival, offering visitors the opportunity to peek behind usually closed doors both of mountain modern Jackson, Wyo., residences and of surrounding historic ranches. The Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes, September 12 and 13, provides a chance to experience the beautiful craftsmanship and unique architectural designs of local homes – including firsthand discussions with the professionals who designed and built them – while Historic Ranch Tours on September 6 offers the chance to experience Jackson Hole’s cowboy culture of old while exploring the beautiful country properties.

“Visitors and locals alike are curious to get an insider’s view of some of Jackson Hole’s fabulous homes and ranches,” says Maureen Murphy, director of special events for the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce, “so these ‘art of the home’ tours have been a popular addition to our annual line-up of Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival events.”

The first home on the Showcase of Homes tour is Shooting Star Elegance, located at the base of Rendezvous Mountain and combining old world style with modern appointments of the highest level. Next is the thoughtfully designed 5,515-square-foot “cabin in the woods” known as the River Meadows Retreat. The tour will also visit Martin Creek Cabin, located in the private Snake River Sporting Club, where the river runs through it.

Now in its second year, the Showcase of Homes tour gives its guests the opportunity to see a variety of imaginative Jackson residential design. More than just a walk-through, the tour also includes face-to-face interaction with the designers, architects and creative professionals responsible for some of the most exclusive and artistic homes in Jackson Hole. Hosted by Homestead Magazine, the Showcase tour is available Sept. 12 and 13 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $75, available at WRJ Design Showroom at 30 S. King St., or online via Homestead Magazine. Ticket proceeds are donated to local charities chosen by the participating homeowners. The tour is limited to 250 tickets so purchase early; this event typically sells out.

Those interested in architecture and design dating back to Jackson Hole’s early days will enjoy the Historic Ranch Tour, where guests will tour historical valley ranches while getting a taste of the area’s cowboy heritage with real cowboys, Wild West entertainment, and an old-fashioned Western barbecue. Hosted by Mountain Living magazine, the tour leaves at 2 p.m. from Home Ranch Parking Lot on the corner of Cache and Gill Streets in Jackson. Tickets are $50, available from the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce. Limited seats are available so advance reservations are required.

Celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2014, the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival continues to secure Jackson’s place as a leading cultural destination for collectors, art lovers, and families alike. The 10-day event presented by the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce brings a signature mix of visual, contemporary, culinary, Western, landscape, wildlife and Native American arts to Jackson, Wyo., September 3 – 14, 2014. Along with the Showcase of Homes tour, The Fall Arts Festival offers visitors more than 50 family-friendly events, many of them free. Visit the festival online at http://www.jacksonholechamber.com/fall_arts_festival/ for a full calendar of events.

Conveniently located just 20 minutes from the Jackson Hole Airport, Jackson is served by major airlines including Delta, United, American and SkyWest. Reservation information for Jackson’s numerous hotels, as well as a complete schedule of Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival events can be found at www.jacksonholechamber.com. For additional information, contact Maureen Murphy at Jackson Hole Chamber, 307.733.3316.

A Range of Masters Currently Hanging at Heather James Fine Art

Jackson Hole enjoys a reputation as one of the premier small arts communities in the country, but even here, the chance to glimpse a canvas by the likes of Van Gogh or Norman Rockwell are slim. Even more unique is the chance to see the juxtaposition of these artists hanging side-by-side on gallery walls–from Impressionists to cutting edge contemporary masters. Don’t miss the opportunity to experience this momentous group exhibition, hanging July through September at Heather James Fine Art! More information and selected artist bios are below.

Robert Townsend,

Heather James Fine Art’s presentation of European and American Masters includes such luminaries as Van Gogh, Bierstadt, Tissot, Grandma Moses, Calder, and Hirst hanging in dialogue with one another. The impressive group exhibition encompasses multiple genres primarily from Modern and Contemporary, California Impressionism, and American art canons. Highlights of the exhibition were created by significant painters such as E. Charlton Fortune, Vincent Van Gogh, Norman Rockwell, and Damien Hirst.

E. Charlton Fortune (1885-1969) is one of the most sought-after California Impressionists. Her painting “Picking Apples,” 1920-1921 is one of Fortune’s most appealing pieces due to its classic Impressionist style of thick brush strokes and warm palette.

Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902) is one of the most well-known landscape painters of the American West. A striking monochrome grisaille, oil on canvas, “Moonlight in Yosemite,” is set in Bierstadt’s beloved Yosemite Valley. The painting depicts a calm dark lake surrounded by soaring mountains shrouded in fog and lit by the moon.

Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) was an iconic post-Impressionist who changed art history using his gestural brush strokes and vibrant palette. Van Gogh painted “Le Moulin” in 1881 when he was only 27. One of only two windmill paintings by Van Gogh, this early piece contains a muted palette of greens and grays.

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) is known for chronicling quintessential American scenes. In his 12 Boy Scouts of America Drawing, the charcoal and pen drawing contains a grid of scenes representing the twelve virtues of the Boy Scouts.

Damien Hirst (b. 1965) is a British contemporary artist recognized for his paintings, medicine cabinet sculptures, and glass tank installations. Hirst’s Spot paintings are an arrangement of color spots with titles that refer to pharmaceutical chemicals. Hirst’s Spin paintings are created by centrifugal force, where Hirst pours paint over spinning canvases. This exhibition contains both a Spot work on paper, “Aurous Iodide,” 2009 and a Spin painting, “Beautiful Andraste Frotteurism Painting,” 2011.

Heather James Fine Art is located at 172 Center Street, Suite 101 in Jackson, WY and maintains a collection of art from various genres including Impressionist and Modern art, Post-War and Contemporary, American, Latin American, Old Master, Photography and Design. For more information about the gallery and upcoming exhibitions, please visit www.heatherjames.com or contact the gallery at 307-200- 6090.For more information about this exhibit, please contact James Carona.

Fall In Love With Art At Two National Museum of Wildlife Art Events

In search of the perfect pre- and post-Valentine’s evenings out? Just mix art, atmosphere, music, and dining TONIGHT and next week at the National Museum of Wildlife Art. What’s not to love? Event details are below:

LION BEFORE STORM II © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

LION BEFORE STORM II © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

Mix’d Media This Evening!

Locals and visitors alike will enjoy an African safari experience in the heart of Jackson Hole with the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s February 13 installment of its popular second-Thursday-of-the-month evening Mix’d Media event. In addition to the opportunity to view the stunning, spare photographs of “Elegy: The African Photography of Nick Brandt 2001-2008” exhibition, which serves as a theme for the event, guests can dine and sip on East African-inspired food and gin and tonics – and try their hand at snipping cut paper silhouettes as the evening’s hands-on art activity. Screen Door Porch will provide live music accompaniment to the festivities. The event takes place from 6-9 p.m. on Thursday, February 13 at the museum. Cover charge is $5 for non-members, free for museum members.

The Mix’d Media event also provides the opportunity for attendees to preview the entries in Trophy Art: Fun Forms for All, all of which goes up for sale on a first-come, first-serve basis on February 22. We had a chance to view a selection of these new takes on traditional animal mounts ourselves. As no animals were harmed in their creation, the entries bridge a whimsical gap between representation and artistic interpretation. From a majestic moose antler taking flight in new form to a delicately hand-painted plaster skull, the trophies would all provide delightful additions to a residential or office wall.

“Deer Skull with Lily” by Jane Lavino is one of the mounts available for sale at the Trophy Art fundraiser.

“Deer Skull with Lily” by Jane Lavino is one of the mounts available for sale at the Trophy Art fundraiser.

Marvel at the selected trophies yourself:

With the tongue-in-cheek tagline “No animals died in the making of these mounts,” the National Museum of Wildlife Art will offer the public an opportunity to purchase unique wildlife-inspired “trophy art,” as well as learn how to decorate using the faux mounts and perhaps create their own “shed antler art” home furnishings from found pieces.

The museum’s new Trophy Art: Fun Forms for All fundraiser takes place February 22 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. with expert talks by interior designer Christy Fox, owner of Wilson Formal in Wilson, and artisan Kyle Anderson of Game Trail Gatherings in Jackson. To add to the fun, a hands-on art activity will be provided, and pizza by Caldera and desserts from Persephone Bakery will be available for tasting. Admission to the event is free and includes access to the Wapiti Gallery, Rising Sage Café and the Museum Shop (regular museum admission will be charged for entry to the rest of the museum galleries).

Having some fun with the misconception of some museum visitors that it displays wildlife taxidermy, the National Museum of Wildlife Art conceived its new Trophy Art fundraiser, soliciting wildlife trophy-inspired artworks from national, Jackson Hole area and even amateur artists. The works will be on display at the museum February 12 – March 15, and are available for sale on a first come, first served basis, beginning at the February 22 event. Proceeds benefit the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s youth education programs.

The schedule of events for the February 22 Trophy Art: Fun Forms for All, to be held in the museum’s Wapiti Gallery, is as follows:

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Christy Fox, owner of Wilson Formal, a shop specializing in art and home design, will answer questions and talk with visitors individually on the topic of “Bringing Wildlife Home – Design with Trophy Art.” Fox is known for her expertise in integrating art, conservation and a deep connection to the Jackson Hole region into her interior and artistic designs.

12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Grown-ups get to channel their inner child with an art activity that allows them to create their own mini-mounts, using multiple mediums for a take-home “trophy.”

1:30 – 2:00 p.m. Kyle Anderson of Game Trail Gatherings will demonstrate how he creates “truly unique home furnishings that transcend the ordinary experience,” using raw materials collected from the wild. Anderson will bring examples of both local and exotic “shed antler art” for his creations.

A member of the Association of Art Museum Directors and the Museums West consortium and accredited by the American Association of Museums, the museum, officially designated the National Museum of Wildlife Art of the United States by an act of Congress in 2008, provides an exciting calendar of exhibitions from its permanent collection and changing exhibitions from around the globe. A complete schedule of exhibitions and events is available online at www.wildlifeart.org. The museum is also active on Facebook and on Twitter at @WildlifeArtJH.

One Work

In this new series on the Homestead blog, we sit back and let Jackson Hole’s creative professionals become the storytellers. Each One Work blog entry is focused on the genesis, production, and meaning behind one significant local piece. During our conversations with artists, designers, and other creatives, we invite you to learn more about craftsmanship and the artistic process. Discover what it takes to make One Work.

Impact

Impact

Walk into the Trio Fine Art gallery and there they are: two towering, silvery canvases dominating an entire slender wall. The paired aspens paintings, Cathedral 1 & Cathedral 2, stop one right in one’s tracks.

“Are they meant to be a pair?”

Apparently, Kathryn Mapes Turner gets this question a lot. We’re in the gallery she co-owns with Jennifer L. Hoffman and Bill Sawczuk, and as she relays the story of how these two stunning works moved from concept to finished paintings, we sip tea and stare upwards, focused in on the flecks of ghostly paint.

Each painting has been composed on the monumental scale of 4×8 feet, and although, in fact, they do not have to be sold as a diptych, their effect together certainly adds to the drama of the wall.

Turner mainly paints plein air canvases and field studies, which necessarily call for a smaller space capable of recording the transitory impressions of nature. She notes that working from her studio allows for more interpretation and the ability to change the scale—in this case, to a soaring eight feet.

Kathryn Turner stands to the left, explaining her process.

Kathryn Turner stands to the left, explaining her process.

In a fashion, Cathedrals 1 & 2 follow a progression of working styles for Turner, who is a life-long painter and local—she grew up on the Triangle X Ranch, one of the oldest continuously operating ranches in Jackson Hole. She herself began with watercolors, which she says “taught [her] the aspect of spontaneity.” In the delicate interplay between water and the tincture of pigment, skill and happy accident find the ideal marriage.

“It’s almost a dance you have with the paint.”

As Turner transitioned to working in oil paints and the larger window of work time they allowed, a premium paper company called Arches began producing a new paper on a large scale. Struck by the notion of combining two separate yet equally rewarding painting approaches, Turner’s thoughts turned to a large canvas, the largest she’d ever painted. She decided to approach this oil painting more like a watercolor, and yet still painting in oil, she’d have more time to experiment. Oil is also the longer-wearing medium, allowing the dual canvases to take shape through a combination of ephemeral brushstrokes and more lasting swirls.

Details

Looking closely at the canvas, one immediately notices its uniquely textured backdrop and almost charcoal metallic hue. This texture came about from embracing just a little bit of chaos. First, Turner mixed up big buckets of paint with heavy doses of water. At this point, she allowed the paint to drip down the entire length of both canvases. As the force of gravity pulled the paint downwards, the pigments of the paint separated and reacted with the watery solvent. “The fun happens when you let the paint do its thing,” Turner says. It’s a sense of adventure and “wait and see” that she brought to the entire project.

What led to the unique titles of Cathedrals 1 & 2? “When I’m in an aspen grove, I feel like I’m in a cathedral. I was driven to do something that would have that same feeling.” The subject also dictated the height of the dual pieces. Aspens are Turner’s favorite trees, and their vertical elegance was a feeling she wanted to duplicate in the impact of her paintings. “I wanted to make them more tree-like.”

The constellations and disturbance of the paint splotches one can observe when up- close-and-personal with the canvases also came about from allowing the paint to drip. While she painted the Cathedrals, Turner had both canvases laid out flat on the floor. A little dripping was inevitable, and quite beautiful.

Up Close

“Process is what teaches us what we need to know,” Turner says.

In terms of process, the framing of Cathedrals 1 & 2 proved the trickiest and most demanding aspect of the creation. The stark black float frames are sold with the pieces, and are designed so that the edges do not obscure any part of the actual painting. These visibly rough and torn edges add even more delightful texture and visual interest to the two ethereal paintings. Attaching the long, thin canvases to the backboard meant dabbling in permanent glue, so there was quite literally only one chance to get the alignment right. With a team of friends and a lot of research, Turner attempted—and succeeded—in the difficult framing.

Edges

Edges

It was all worth it, too, as the lack of glass dispels any separation between the paintings and the viewer. As Turner knows, these are the sort of works that beg to be scrutinized; often viewers even put out a tentative hand to touch them, catching themselves and stopping before going any further.

She’s glad of the varying reactions and inquiries she’s received regarding the paintings so far, explaining that, “when art inspires different reactions it makes it more compelling.”

As for Turner, she knows these two singular paintings are something that can’t be replicated—not by look or feel or the many serendipitous experiments that led to their completion. For everyone who sees them, whether once or repeatedly, they are pieces with their own place in time, history, and experience. Landscape painters know well the ineffable and mutable subject that endlessly fascinates them.

“I could never do this again,” Turner laughs. “That’s what art is.”

Visit Cathedrals 1 & 2 yourself during the upcoming View 22 event hosted by Trio Fine Art on Dec. 6 from 5-8pm. You can also contact Kathryn Mapes Turner at kathryn@turnerfineart.com and view samples of her other work at Turner Fine Art.

Modern Living the Dynia Way

A Canvas for LivingDuring Homestead Magazine’s Showcase of Homes, many patrons had the same response to one of the residences—a modernist masterwork located on Gros Ventre Butte. As they sauntered through the wide, airy rooms with chestnut-hued cement floors and black steel accents, they blurted out, “I could live in this house!”

But why had the sentiment taken them by surprise?

We sat down for a chat with Stephen Dynia of Stephen Dynia Architects to discuss his history of pushing the design envelope in Jackson Hole, and how the “surprise” of modern architecture may actually exist in its perfect harmony with our landscape.

Stephen Dynia’s work is well-known throughout Jackson Hole. Chances are, if you’ve encountered a spare, clean construction with light truss work and sparkling glass, you’ve come across a home or commercial space with the Dynia stamp. Notably, the firm designed the local Center for the Arts building, which opened in 2004, as well as multiple other buildings in the valley. Dynia himself surveys the town from what he affectionately dubs his “plateau”: an unexpected mixed-use development reached by veering up the bluff right after the 89/22 Junction. There, Stephen Dynia Architects works from an open, multi-level structure, and a series of metal-sided work/live spaces next door beckon with glass entries and bright doors.

Innovative AnglesIt’s true that modern architectural work such as this plateau and the showcased Gros Ventre residence often stand out in a sea of traditionally “western” homes, including the nouveau lodge aesthetic favored by homeowners who build to impress. However, Dynia’s take is that much of this architecture is “based on a romance with something that doesn’t quite exist in this time.” He points out that the original log buildings of this valley were built within the constraints of the materials available, and were intended to keep the environment out, rather than let it in. If current Jackson Hole home ownership is all about views, then homesteader values were about warmth, protection, and barricades from snowdrifts and curious wildlife.

Dynia considers newer homes built in the log tradition to be theatrical—theirs is a style that swerves away from the path of history and the actual materials of modern building. In his own design work, he “tries to transcend something that is merely stylistic” to find a more contemporaneous mode of expression.

“My mission is that architecture should be relevant to the era that it’s built in.”

A Site to BeholdDynia strives to make history with his designs, rather than invoke nostalgia for a vanished place and time. To this end, his firm is rigorous about relating every structure to its place, and thereby interpreting the place via architectural elements.

Dynia’s is a design philosophy hewn among the soaring glass and steel structures of New York City, where he got his start at a large firm that specialized in a corporate Modernist aesthetic. These are buildings that, in the truest interpretation of Modernism, are “consistent with [their] method of construction.” Once transplanted to Jackson Hole, Dynia sought out the trace of a Mies van der Rohe-designed home at the Snake River Ranch, a mostly-scrapped project that nevertheless represented the first U.S. design by the modern architecture giant during the 1930’s. In this Dynia saw encouragement–Jackson Hole had already begun incubating the cosmopolitan leanings that could lead to an embrace of modern style.Detail

In conversation, Dynia references other notable architects who have added immeasurably to the recognizable architecture of the valley. Mentioning the Teton County Library and Mad River’s flagship headquarters south of Jackson, he is the first to acknowledge that the wave of modern building is multifarious. Rather than limit building concepts to “abide by look rather than experience,” the unique qualities of our valley require “the freedom of a more expressive building form.”

For Dynia’s firm–particularly in regards to local residences–this experience begins in the sequence of how one enters a home. He likes adding drama to this approach by at first denying expansive views, only to re-introduce them. This sudden reveal draws a gasp and a significant pause. In moments like these, we are truly inside a space—participating in its interaction with a setting. Hallways and stairwells opening to glimpses of sweeping Gros Ventre views surely contributed to the same alchemy during Homestead’s Showcase.

In these award-winning 28x28x28 cubes in downtown Jackson, three levels of living culminate in 360 degree views from the uppermost roof deck. Eschewing the urge to build outwards, these cubes interpret “ how you can live in a place differently” and “literally heighten the experience of landscape” as you climb up to see the whole valley laid below you.

In these award-winning 28x28x28 cubes in downtown Jackson, three levels of living culminate in 360 degree views from the uppermost roof deck. Eschewing the urge to build outwards, these cubes interpret“ how you can live in a place differently” and “literally heighten the experience of landscape” as you climb up to see the whole valley laid below you.

Dynia speculates that our occasional resistance to the stripped down and simplified lines of modern building wells from discomfort. “Psychologically, people are afraid of simplicity.” At the same time, the more restrained the space in its embellishments, the more soothing and reflective it becomes. The clean, uncluttered architectural canvas asks to be completed by the personality of its residents, while more “fluid and sculptural” lines imbue the home with a sense of serenity.

“My work always incorporates somes kind of innovation and inspiration from nature,” Dynia says. He plays with elements like light to mimic the act of walking in the woods, and is always seeking new ways to pay homage to the texture of a landscape.

Dynia Architects currently splits its efforts between Jackson Hole and a number of exciting projects in Denver. Recently, a former truck terminal-turned-urban-office-hotspot known as Drive earned the firm a prestigious AIA Award. These new projects indulge Dynia’s long-held passion for contributing to the culture of community, just as in his home designs, he favors open, centralized spaces that corral loved ones together to bolster the attendant “culture of a family.” In the firm’s sustainable new projects, the existing infrastructure (truck terminals and iron foundries) are recycled into energetic community spaces that are meant to bridge our contemporary mode of detachment living—i.e. live in one zone, work and play in another. To this end, Drive, and the under-construction Drive 2 all contain a shared conference room or lounge, with garage-style doors on every floor that dispel separation from the outdoors with a simple lift upwards.Roof Garden 022

This vision is the same one Dynia has for Jackson, which has been his design laboratory for decades. “Do you want a town that simply preserves itself?” Dynia asks. Of course, his answer is a resounding “No.” Rather, he is encouraged by the current balance being struck in downtown Jackson between conservation and human habitation. In his opinion, the “town is getting healthier” as it continues to embrace mixed use zoning and greater urban-style density. This is the modus operandi behind his own work-live zone on the “plateau.”

So, back to the reactions of those Showcase attendees. Surprise, Dynia thinks, is a hallmark of what his firm is doing here. Viewers will always react to light and the experience of a space, and Dynia’s architecture is intended to capitalize on just that. The austere lines of a modern home may intimidate from the curb, but once inside, an unexpected warmth and peace take hold. In sum, “leadership in design is about leading.” It is about creating bold, benchmark projects and presenting new modes of lived experience, whether in the great room of a home or in the lobby of the Center for the Arts, a glass-framed Snow King beyond.

That surprise is, in fact, “the story of my time here. That’s the payoff.”

2013 Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes: Recap

This year as part of the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival, Homestead Magazine’s Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes presented something unique: the chance for patrons to leave the gallery space for the home interior space. In recognition of the vibrant architectural, design, and building community of the valley, the Showcase offered ticket holders an intimate glimpse into every aspect of three magnificent local homes, and the opportunity to interface directly with the design professionals who made it so.

From airy modern to warmly-textured western to updated lodge luxury, the three featured properties—Gros Ventre Overlook, Owl Creek Elk Refuge, and Tucker Ranch Retreat—meant a full sampling of the latest in architectural and design innovation. “We loved the fact that all three houses were very different and all three spectacular!” noted one guest. Spaced over two glorious fall days in Jackson Hole, 200 guests experienced a treasure hunt of a day with rambles through “dream homes” that are usually sealed to the public, hors d’oeuvres, and most importantly, the chance to enjoy face-to-face conversations with premier valley artisans in the fields of architecture, building, and interior and exterior design.

The Showcase of Homes was successful in raising $9000 for local charities selected by the generous homeowners that opened up their doors, including The Grand Teton National Park Foundation, Center for the Arts, and JH Land Trust. Each organization will also receive a matching grant through the Old Bill’s Fun Run for Charities. Event organizer Megan Jenkins counted the event a resounding success based on “the enthusiasm showed for each project by all of the attendees” and the “opportunity for people to have one-on-one conversations with the design professionals.  You could really appreciate the work and craftsmanship of each home.  People really had a great time and were extremely complimentary. ”  She hopes that the attendees were inspired and motivated to try “innovative things with their own spaces.”

This was echoed by multiple guests, who indicated that they attended precisely to network with design professionals and were looking forward to following up with the artisans who designed, built, or furnished the homes they visited during the tour. One noted the “informative,” “friendly,” and “welcoming” aspect of the Showcase, while another enthused, “I loved seeing the exquisite houses and having all of the builders, designers and others present to answer questions.”

Participating design professionals were able to connect with patrons in the context of their own design schemes and craftsmanship, illuminating their work in new ways. “It really is rewarding to have great clients who let you show off their home and attendees who comment on what a great job we all did,” noted Sharon Nunn, Vice-President of Ellis Nunn & Associates, Inc., whose firm designed the Owl Creek Refuge. “I look forward to doing it again next year.”

Bradley Suske of The Bradley Company—landscaping firm for the Tucker Rancher Retreat—felt similarly. “I thought it was an amazing experience for me,” he said. “I really felt like I was in my element.”

Megan Jenkins was pleasantly surprised at “how excited people were to be able to tour some of the masterpieces that are in this valley.” The three homes on the self-guided Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes tour allowed a multi-layered peek into all the creativity afoot in the Intermountain West, and the Renaissance in western style being forged by our singular community of creators, drafters, and craftspeople. With the canvas of the Tetons as its backdrop, Jackson Hole’s creative identity continues to evolve, and these exciting new properties are on the vanguard of it all.

Our mission at Homestead Magazine is to highlight Jackson Hole’s top-notch residential architecture and design community for local homeowners and visitors. Next year, we hope you’ll join us to tour one-of-a-kind homes, learn the ins and outs of the design process, and be inspired by the myriad possibilities of your own spaces.

Twenty Two Home: Jackson’s Freshest Home Decor Shop

So you’re decorating a home in Jackson Hole. You’re probably inspired by Wyoming’s beautiful landscapes and would like to bring that aesthetic into your interior design scheme. So… heavy rustic fabrics, taxidermy, and knotty pine, right? Think again, says Saxon Koch, buyer and manager of Twenty Two Home, home décor shop, and the newest addition to Jackson’s Town Square. [Read more…]